Thriller (1960–1962)
8.5/10
123
5 user 2 critic

The Devil's Ticket 

A artist "pawns" his soul to the devil and must retrieve it by painting a portrait of another person whose soul will be exchanged for his.

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(adaptation), (story)
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
...
Himself
...
Hector Vane
...
Nadja
Joan Tetzel ...
Marie Vane
...
...
Mr. Spengler
...
Dr. Frank
...
Art Critic
Audrey Swanson ...
The Nurse
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Storyline

A artist "pawns" his soul to the devil and must retrieve it by painting a portrait of another person whose soul will be exchanged for his.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

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deal with the devil | See All (1) »


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Release Date:

18 April 1961 (USA)  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

 
The Devil Will Have His Due
20 November 2016 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This is the best of all the Thriller episodes I have see so far. When I saw it was written by Robert Bloch, I knew it would be good. We are treated at the beginning to the final moments of a man who has accumulated a ton of money, only to be tossed into the pit of hell by the Prince of Darkness. Soon we cut to an artist and his wife, getting by meagerly, living in a dumpy apartment, eating soup (all they can afford). He goes to a pawnbroker to try to get a few bucks to get through the week, leaving one of his paintings. Before he leaves, he has pawned his soul, trading it for three months of success. As is the case in these archetypal offerings, he begins to spend the money he is now rife with like crazy, even taking a mistress over his loving wife. The deal is that he must paint a portrait of a person whose soul will now take the place of his. I won't begin to ruin the final moments of "The Devil's Ticket," but suffice it to say, it is a masterwork of irony (and ultimately justice). The performances are very good. It continues the theme that when dealing with the Devil, he will come out ahead, even when one feels he has all the chips.


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