France, 1875. A condemned man learns of a legal loophole that he would be pardoned if the executioner dies before his execution. He then enlists his wife in a scheme to make sure that this improbable scenario comes to pass.

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(adaptation), (story)
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
...
Himself
...
Monsieur de Paris
...
Babette Lamont
...
Robert Lamont
Gregory Morton ...
The Prison Director
Marcel Hillaire ...
The Barber, M. Guillaume
Gaylord Cavallaro ...
The Cabbie, Francois Trintineaux
Janine Grandel ...
Madame LeClerc
...
The Assistant Director
Louis Mercier ...
The Wall Guard
Peter Camlin ...
Louis
Peter Balakoff ...
The Prisoner (as Ted Roter)
Guy De Vestel ...
The Priest
David Cross ...
Guard 1 (as David R. Cross)
Charles La Torre ...
The Doctor
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Storyline

France, 1875. A condemned man learns of a legal loophole that he would be pardoned if the executioner dies before his execution. He then enlists his wife in a scheme to make sure that this improbable scenario comes to pass.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

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title directed by female | See All (1) »


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Details

Release Date:

26 September 1961 (USA)  »

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Trivia

"Monsieur de Paris", the name by which the Robert Middleton character is addressed, was the unofficial title of France's sole headsman after 1870, when the declining frequency of executions forced the retirement of the various provincial headsmen. See more »

Quotes

Robert Lamont: I win! I win! I win!
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User Reviews

 
Plausibility & Peine de Mort
1 July 2012 | by (Minneapolis, Minnesota) – See all my reviews

After the Reign of Terror and the general bloodletting of the Napoleonic wars, French juries reserved the death penalty for particularly heinous offenses. From the context of a killing resulting from a crime of passion it is unlikely that this would be an appropriate punishment. French bureaucracy, however, makes the central argument likely. The Sanson family were chief executioners from before the time of Armand du Plessis (for whom they executed Cinq-Mars) through the Terror and the Napoleonic era. It is likely that the blade would be akin to the sword and would be considered a tool of the trade belonging only to that "craftsman". As such it could not be used by another. Also, the death of the executioner would suggest a divine intervention--a trial by ordeal.


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