Third Watch: Season 1, Episode 14

32 Bullets and a Broken Heart (14 Feb. 2000)

TV Episode  -   -  Action | Crime | Drama
4.0
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A gunman is targeting gays, prompting a vigilante response from the community who feels the police aren't doing enough. Faith arrests her husband for drunk driving, Ty tries to help a young... See full summary »

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Title: 32 Bullets and a Broken Heart (14 Feb 2000)

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Dr. Sara Morales
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Maggie Davis
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Treva
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Gail Moore
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Vangie Sundstrom
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Storyline

A gunman is targeting gays, prompting a vigilante response from the community who feels the police aren't doing enough. Faith arrests her husband for drunk driving, Ty tries to help a young man whose sister he arrested, Carlos gets involved with a pretty patient, and Bobby and Kim deal with the fallout from their night together. Written by Anonymous

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14 February 2000 (USA)  »

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When Faith is at home with Bosco and her kids after arresting Fred, she takes off her jacket. It's then back on and she takes it off again. See more »

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Okay, Let's Examine What Was Wrong Here
20 March 2009 | by See all my reviews

The story was a gunman was shooting gay organizations; first a gay wedding, then a gay club gathering.

Now the problem here was the assumption made on various persons, or the convenience in a couple of situations.

But I am ahead of myself. Okay, first the gay wedding is shot up.

What? The bride is man? Once again, Hollywood must cling to Leave It To Beaver and Donna Reed for its belief in how mainstream America reacts to current events.

In truth, it tends to be the younger generation, Bosco's generation, that is more abiding and accepting and not surprised by these new, and in this era, very established, trends.

Who today is surprised by a gay wedding, legal or not? What are we handed? Well, simply a darling little priest who insists it is a hate crime and that the police won't do enough.

They never do enough and this is the result.

Well, bless you, Father. If the priest was gay or not, I don't recall, but more on this later.

So then the gay club is shot up, and we are handed a militant gay organizer who feels it is necessary to fight back for homosexuals, since (once again) the police ain't going to do enough for us! Now, by chance, the priest is present. He feels he is needed here.

This is the convenience to the story.

Now all this while, Bosco is being confronted with being homophobic by his comments and unsympathetic reactions, but the gay militant is allowed to taunt Bosco (who didn't say a word to him by this time) and his anger is justified.

Along the way, we get our gay militant attacking a gay man who fits the description of the shootist (brown jacket).

Then we get the final attack and our militant organization has to be pulled off the killer by Bosco.

Then here comes the priest.

Bless his heart, the priest decides it is necessary that he and he alone should ask God to forgive the killer. Bosco and the gay militant quietly back away, incapable of forgiving as the priest obviously can.

Now if the killer, named Tom, were capable of speaking coherently, more than likely he would tell the priest not to bother, that he doesn't want the priest to make such a request.

But of course, Tom has been pummeled by the militant group. I wonder if they were arrested for beating him up to such an extent? Show doesn't say.

What was also convenient was that the militant fellow KNEW the priest.

Now how would this guy have reacted if it had been ANOTHER, UNKNOWN priest? Would he have backed away? What if it had been an openly hetero priest, who didn't condone gay unions or activities? Would the militant have backed away? This episode dances unpleasantly close to the concept that anyone who might disapprove of homosexuality or gay unions condones the gunman's actions.

Unfortunately, what it also showed was that the so-called 'forgiving' priest wasn't very forgiving if the police failed at corralling hatemongers as he snarled at Bosco at the wedding.

Why forgive the gunman but can't forgive the priest? Forgiveness should only be given upon death? What if Tom wasn't Catholic? Not as multi-faceted as someone may have wanted it to be, that's for sure.


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