Jim arrives in Reno to visit his cousin Eve. Because Jim is in town, Eve and her fiancé Len decide on an impromptu wedding. When Jim lends the couple money for the ceremony, trouble ensues.

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Len
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Winnie May
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Jim arrives in Reno to visit his cousin Eve. Because Jim is in town, Eve and her fiancé Len decide on an impromptu wedding. When Jim lends the couple money for the ceremony, trouble ensues.

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Adventure | Drama

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4 February 1970 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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We find out that Jim Bronson likes honey in his coffee. See more »

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On A Lucky Day - A Moment Of Truth
26 October 2006 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

At a stoplight, Jim Bronson (Michael Parks) on his trademark motorcycle speaks with a curious driver who evinces envy for Bronson's unfettered lifestyle. Bronson speeds off on the motorcycle for Reno, Nevada, where he plans to attend the marriage of his cousin, Eve Bronson (Lynne Marta) to Len (Barry Brown.)

Bronson surprises Eve by entering the store where she works, dons a silly cap, picks up an item and pokes her in the back with it. She turns around, startled - then they laugh and embrace.

At a local casino, they meet up with Eve's fiancé, Len, a fresh-faced college student (who inexplicably sports a long, trailing scarf wrapped around his neck.) Len is eager to "tie the knot," but Eve appears to be getting "cold feet"; she wants reassurance that Jimmy (as her only relative) will be around for the nuptials.

They then ride to a wedding chapel on their respective motorcycles: Bronson, on his; Len, with Eve riding behind.

Inside the modest building await Ned (presumably a minister, with string tie and Western-style attire) and his wife, Winnie Mae. Eve takes in the tackiness of the atmosphere, as well as the couple who own the chapel and bolts, crying that she wants a "real wedding."

Outside, Eve complains that she wants a "church wedding" and a wedding gown, so Jim Bronson generously gives her the money for the dress.

Eve is walking in her wedding dress to the wedding chapel where Bronson and Len are waiting. Suddenly, she rushes across the street, hops in a taxi and inexplicably goes to a casino to gamble and is "on a roll," winning heavily...

Jim and Len (who have been waiting impatiently at the "Chapel of the Bells") go off in search of her. When they find Eve, she refuses to stop gambling because of her "lucky streak."

By a lake, Len and Jim discuss Eve's gambling; Len is worried about that factor, as well as her uncertainty about the marriage. He goes to the casino to reason with her - then storms off when she refuses to leave after crapping out. He heads back to Bronson's shakedown by the river.

Bronson goes and finds Eve on a winning streak at craps. He grabs the money, and gives her a letter from Len.

Eve and Len are now drinking champagne. Len finds out that ultimately Eve blew everything, and hocked his motorcycle, besides. (It will take $40 to get the motorcycle back.) Eve now emerges as a childish, and very selfish individual.

Jim wants to help Eve lose money at gambling as an object lesson, but ironically, she keeps winning. He tells her to look at the people around her who are gambling - how they are of no substance; ultimately, the lesson sinks in.

They go to look for Len. At Harrah's Automobile Museum, Eve meets Len, and they rush off to get married.

However at the chapel, the old conflicts resurface. Len and Eve meet another young couple, also getting married, but Eve and Len start fighting again. Finally, they decide not to marry after all, push the other two ahead of them, and meet Bronson outside with the news,

Grateful to be relieved of the frustrating situation, Bronson leaves Reno...

Michael Parks (Jim Bronson), a popular TV actor of the 1950's and 1960's was perfect as the cool, laid-back Jim Bronson. He embodied the dying spirit of the rugged independence of the Old West. Like the cowboy, Bronson's soul was his own; his first love - the open road, and wherever it would take him.

Lynne Marta (Eve Bronson) was also a popular performer on many shows of the 1960's and 1970's, and turned in a highly convincing performance as Bronson's mercurial cousin who sacrificed the stability of marriage for the ephemeral hedonism of the gambling tables.

Barry Brown (Len), who was one of the most talented and sensitive actors of the 1970's, played the handsome, clean-cut college boy Len with an energetic, genial verve. He was very expressive as he ran the emotional gamut of delight, concern, consternation, outright anger and finally, resignation in dealing with his flaky fiancée, Eve.

Although this episode was a bit thin on plot(and with the exception of the cars, which date the show), this drama might have been written yesterday; it confronts problems that are timeless: (1)compulsive gambling; and (2)individuals who will not grow up and behave responsibly.

"Then Came Bronson" was a charming (but short-lived) show; this is one episode worth seeing.


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