That Girl (1966–1971)
7.8/10
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Pass the Potatoes, Ethel Merman 

Ann is working with Broadway legend Ethel Merman and gets a walk-on part in her revival of "Gypsy."

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Episode complete credited cast:
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Lew Parker ...
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Ruth Bauman (as Carolan Daniels)
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Ed Burns
Renata Vanni ...
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Miss Bridges
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Storyline

After auditioning for a small one-line walk-on part for a stage production of "Gypsy", Ann is excited not only to get the part, but to be chosen specifically by the production's leading lady, Ethel Merman. Ann thinks that Miss Merman may regret her decision when Ann acts more like a star struck fan than a professional actress during rehearsals. As such, Ann tries to avoid Miss Merman when they aren't rehearsing on stage. But when Donald and Ann see Miss Merman eating dinner alone in her dressing room, Donald, on a whim, asks her if she would like to join him and Ann for dinner at Ann's apartment. This act mortifies Ann, as her star struck self wouldn't even think that someone of Ethel Merman's celebrity status would even consider it. To Ann's surprise, Miss Merman not only says yes, but offers to cook dinner for them. Beyond the true star struck fans from Ann's apartment building descending on her apartment during the evening to catch a glimpse of Ethel Merman, Ann sees that a ... Written by Huggo

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Comedy

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7 September 1967 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Joy Harmon appears in the beginning of the episode as the blonde auditioning for the show, later in the year she would be seen in "Cool Hand Luke" in the now very famous car washing scene. See more »

Crazy Credits

"Miss THOMAS' Fashions by CARDINALI" refers to the fashion house run by Marilyn Lewis. See more »

Connections

Referenced in That Girl: The Other Woman (1968) See more »

Soundtracks

Everything's Coming Up Roses
(uncredited)
Music by Jule Styne
Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim
Performed by Ethel Merman
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User Reviews

 
A frisky episode for Marlo's Ann Marie...
26 December 2007 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

One of the better-written episodes from "That Girl"'s second season (by Jim Brooks, of all people) has perky-but-scatterbrained Ann Marie getting a bit part in a stage revival of "Gypsy" starring Ethel Merman. Ann simply cannot contain her enthusiasm for Ms. Merman and nearly makes an unprofessional pest out of herself. Luckily, Merman (doing a fantastic comedic turn) is just a regular, down-to-Earth kinda gal and soon winds up in Ann's kitchen cooking dinner! I have always had a few nitpicks about this show, starting with Ann's name. 'Ann-Marie' is great as a first name, but it always sounded strange to me hearing her father introduce himself as 'Mr. Marie'. Why couldn't their surname be Murray--Ann could be 'Ann-Marie Murray'? Another problem is with the casting of 'Mr. Marie': Lew Parker continually played this role on the verge of mental exasperation (and he was certainly exasperating!); no one ever gets to put the man in his place (when he's wrong, he just looks pig-headed, yet nobody calls him on it). Ann was another frustrating writers' creation: sparkly, flirtatious, but constantly silly-acting, she's the lovable klutz--a throwback to the gals of screwball comedy. If Ann had been conceived as somewhat more savvy, she might have been a great pre-feminist character. As such, she's a well-groomed imp, a little girl playing dress-up, and one waits patiently for her to turn that patented spunk into some street-smarts.


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