Tales of Tomorrow (1951–1953)
8.3/10
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5 user
A live telecast of Tales of Tomorrow (1951) keeps being broken into by a phantom broadcast of a cheating couple preparing to launch her soused husband out a window. The Tales of Tomorrow (... See full summary »

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(by) (as Frank P. De Felitta)
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
...
Henry
...
Al
...
Jean
William Coburn ...
Father
...
Daughter
Muffet Peter ...
Secretary
Jim Walsh ...
Himself - Floor Manager
...
Himself - Announcer
Robert F. Lewine ...
Himself - Agency Executive
Merle Worster ...
Himself - Chief Engineer
Don Medford ...
Himself - Director
Mort Abrahams ...
Himself - Producer
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Storyline

A live telecast of Tales of Tomorrow (1951) keeps being broken into by a phantom broadcast of a cheating couple preparing to launch her soused husband out a window. The Tales of Tomorrow (1951) crew scramble to investigate if the caper's real and if so, how can they interrupt the murder already in progress? Written by David Stevens

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7 November 1952 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

 
"The Window": one of television's finest thirty minutes ever.
13 February 2007 | by See all my reviews

This is the creative and surprising "War of the Worlds"-like episode where a "Tales of Tomorrow" story begins normally but suddenly we see that the live telecast is being interrupted by outside forces that halt the drama-within-a-drama and throw the entire production into chaos. Crew, actors and bystanders are in turmoil as the panicked, confused and set-upon production personnel attempt to comprehend the nature of the disastrous broadcast which is collapsing all around them. Interestingly there were no national incidents this time around, but the network and local switchboards must have fielded a few calls nonetheless. This was masterful television, and a great example of why the period is called the Golden Age.


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