Jeff Saunders is a Special Enforcement Agent with the California Highway Patrol, where percentage and luck are on their side.

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(teleplay) (as Frederic Brady), (story "The Homesick Buick")
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
...
Patrolman Jeff Saunders
...
Sheriff Sternweister
...
Sheriff George Thomas
...
Williams
Irene James ...
Female Robber
...
Bank Teller
Joseph Sargent ...
Male Robber
Richard Collier ...
Bald Man
Jim Hayward ...
Henry Willows
Dorothea Lord ...
Motorist
Anthony Jochim ...
Motorist
...
Motorist
Ken Christy ...
Bartender
John Frederick ...
Bit Role (as John Merrick)
Jason Johnson ...
Caretaker
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Storyline

Jeff Saunders is a Special Enforcement Agent with the California Highway Patrol, where percentage and luck are on their side.

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Genres:

Drama | Family

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Details

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Release Date:

29 March 1958 (USA)  »

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Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Unsold pilot for a proposed but unrealized television series titled 'Motorcycle Cop'. See more »

Quotes

Patrolman Jeff Saunders: Excuse me, ma'am - somebody seems in an awful hurry to die.
[after a car speeds passed him]
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User Reviews

 
Stand up Police drama
18 September 2012 | by (Canada) – See all my reviews

GETAWAY – 1958 This is an episode from the anthology series, STUDIO 57. This series ran for 124 episodes between 1954 and 1958.

It is a small California town and three cars pull up outside the local bank. Three men, Joseph Sargent, Rick Vallin, John Frederick and a single woman, Irene James, enter the bank.

James approaches the teller and asks to cash a money order. The teller asks for identification. James, smiles, reaches into her purse and pulls a large revolver.

At the same time, Vallin lays the barrel of his gun alongside the bank guard's head. "No one move! It is a robbery!" Bellows Sargent.

Of course some idiot makes a play to grab a gun. Sargent gives the man 3 rounds for his trouble. The others empty out the vault and exit the bank. As the thieves take off in different directions the bank alarm starts wailing.

Hardware store owner, Jim Hayward, pulls a rifle out and gets in a shot on one of the getaway cars.

Just outside of town, Mike Connors, a motorcycle cop, is nearly killed as one of the getaway cars narrowly misses him. On his beast he leaps and off in pursuit he roars.

A couple of miles up the road the car crashes. Connors pulls up and pulls the man out of the wreckage. The man, Frederick, is dead. It seems the store owner had hit his mark.

The town Sheriff, John McIntire, has his boys go over the car but they find nothing. No id, nothing. The dead man's fingerprints are also a dead end.

Connors gets an idea! He checks all the settings on the car radio. They are all set for a town 50 miles away.

The local Sheriff, Wallace Ford, offers the use of his men and cars. Connors and company hit the bars etc looking for people who match the description.

They catch a break when, Ken Christy, a local bartender, gives them a lead. They track down the remaining three bandits at a rented house.

Of course the three have no intention of coming quietly. Vallin is killed while Sargent and James escape in a car. They lead Connors and the other boys in blue on a wild car chase. Though their tires have been shot out, they still refuse to cooperate. Sargent goes down under a hail of lead before James finally gives up.

This nicely done policer was offered around as a possible series.

The director was Earl Bellamy. Bellamy helmed over 1000 TV episodes. The d of p was Mack Stengler. His film work includes, FALL GUY, THE ARGYLE SECRETS and I WOULDN'T BE IN YOUR SHOES.

Joseph Sargent would later become a director. THE TAKING OF PELHAM ONE TWO THREE and James Cagney's last film, TERRIBLE JOE MORAN are a couple of his films.

The writer was John D. MacDonald. MacDonald wrote the popular Travis McGee series of books. He also wrote THE EXECUTIONERS, which became the film, CAPE FEAR. (b/w)


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