Harold has joined an amateur dramatics group who use the Steptoe house as a rehearsal room for their play set in Afghanistan during the days of the Raj. Initially mistrustful of actors ... See full summary »

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(uncredited)

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(by), (by)
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
Wilfrid Brambell ...
Harry H. Corbett ...
...
Rupert Ffaines - Muir
...
Nemone Wagstaff
Betty Huntley-Wright ...
Deirdre
...
Reporter
...
Stage Actor
John Anderson ...
Stage Actor
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Storyline

Harold has joined an amateur dramatics group who use the Steptoe house as a rehearsal room for their play set in Afghanistan during the days of the Raj. Initially mistrustful of actors Albert changes his mind when given a part in the play but his snide interruptions during Harold's scene with leading lady Nemone, plus his inability to read his lines correctly, get on Harold's nerves. Come the performance however a nervous Harold is a flop whilst his father is the star of the show. Leaving the stage door Harold is asked by a young boy if he is an actor but replies he is a rag and bone man and will never be anything more before throwing a bottle through the dressing room window. Written by don @ minifie-1

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Genres:

Comedy

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Release Date:

28 February 1972 (UK)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Trivia

This episode is particularly ironic because it portrays Harold (Harry H. Corbett) as a potential theatrical actor, while yearning to move away from his Rag & Bone man job. In real life, Corbett wanted to broaden his acting abilities into other TV & film genres, but because of the huge success of Steptoe & Son, he became frustrated at being typecast in similar comedic roles.

The final scene here also shows Harold frustrated at not being the success he had hoped for on the stage. See more »

Connections

References On the Waterfront (1954) See more »

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User Reviews

 
A Star Is Born
10 December 2016 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

This certainly is a memorable episode mainly for actress Margaret Nolan making a busty appearance. No wonder Harold forgets his lines. I like to think Mary Whitehouse was watching this and had a mini seizure and rang for the ambulance.

Harold is dabbling in amateur dramatics and has bagged a lead part in a colonial set period play opposite the well endowed and leather skirted Nemone (Margaret Nolan.) Rupert (Trevor Bannister) is the author and director whose old fashioned play is a supposed allegory of Vietnam and decides to cast Albert for the posh part of the retired officer 'Carstairs.'

Albert who has been pulling Harold's leg and has hung around to make a nuisance of himself decides to take on the role, well he performed during the Great War and he can do a posh accent much to Harold's annoyance.

In the opening night it is Albert who wows the audience and not Harold who realises he is just meant to be a rag and bone man.

Harry H Corbett who apparently was regarded as the English Marlon Brando in his early theatre days, gets to emulate him as he recites lines from On the Waterfront.


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