The conflict between the Rabbi father and the son who disappoints him by seeking a secular career instead of a religious touches a Jewish cord, although it has a universal aspect.

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, (from an adaptation by) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
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Joey Robin / Joey Rabinowitz
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Ginny Gibson
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Cantor Morris Rabinowitz
...
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Nathan Gittleson
Joey Faye ...
Tony De Santos
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Larry
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Harry Lee
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Television Director
Phil Arnold ...
Messenger
Sid Cassel ...
Dr. Miller (as Sid Cassele)
Bob Duggan ...
Stage Manager
Dorain Grusman ...
Marilyn (as Dorian Grusman)
Frances Weintraub Lax ...
Ida (as Frances Lax)
Louise Vincent ...
Rosalie
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Storyline

The conflict between the Rabbi father and the son who disappoints him by seeking a secular career instead of a religious touches a Jewish cord, although it has a universal aspect.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Musical

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Details

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Release Date:

13 October 1959 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

According to David Crosthwait of DC Video, the company that restored this videotape, this specific episode of Startime (1959) was taped at the then-NBC studio in Brooklyn, NY, and hand-edited. Color videotape was in its infancy; only about a year previous to this [1959] the first color videotapes were recorded at NBC. The copy was a dub found at NBC. The tapes used proprietary electronics unique to NBC, which is one reason why restoration took time. The tape was missing part of its audio. The Lewis family donated a kinescope film copy of the show, along with a 1/4" audio tape of much of the show's soundtrack to finish the restoration. See more »

Soundtracks

Israel's Keeper
Music and Lyrics by A.W. Binder
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User Reviews

 
A Shrunk Version of the Story, But It Does Have Jerry Lewis
12 April 2014 | by (Orlando, United States) – See all my reviews

This has a good cast, but they are forced to do the story in just 52 minutes for a one hour television show. It is really not enough time and they are only given a couple a short scenes each. Imagine any decent play, for example "Hamlet" or "A Doll's House being cut to 52 minutes and you understand the problem. There are only a few cheap sets and the story just barely pulls you in dramatically before it suddenly ends.

The center of the piece is Jerry Lewis. He certainly makes the story seem autobiographical with the script tailored to make him a comedian instead of the title Jazz Singer. Yet he puts a good deal of feeling into it, forsaking the more outrageous and juvenile slapstick that he is known for. He acts much closer to his sincere, heart on the sleeve, Muscular Dystrophy Telephon Host.

If you don't like Jerry Lewis, you will hate it. If you're a Jerry Lewis fan, you'll forgive the shortcomings and appreciate that this is one of the few dramatic roles he played at the peak of his career.

If you're Jewish add another star for an 8 out of 10. The conflict between the Rabbi father and the son who disappoints him by seeking a secular career instead of a religious touches a Jewish cord, although it has a universal aspect.


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