Dante arrests murderess Dr. Nasreen and her browbeaten teenage son Ajit. Unbeknownst to Dante, Nasreen possesses a device that can control his mind.

Director:

(as S. Philip Jackson)

Writers:

(creator), (story) | 3 more credits »
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
...
...
Lucretia Scott
...
Percy Montana
...
...
...
Dr. Nasreen
...
Ajit (as Jazz Mann)
Peter Pacey ...
Dr. McIntyre

Comic-Con 2017: All Aboard the IMDboat

 | 

July 20 to 23, 2017

Get entertainment news, trailer drops, and photos with IMDb's coverage of 2017 San Diego Comic-Con featuring host and IMDboat captain Kevin Smith. Watch our exclusive celebrity interviews, and tune in to our LIVE show from 3:30 to 5 p.m. PDT on Saturday, July 22.

Browse Our Guide to Comic-Con

Edit

Storyline

Dante arrests murderess Dr. Nasreen and her browbeaten teenage son Ajit. Unbeknownst to Dante, Nasreen possesses a device that can control his mind.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Action | Sci-Fi

Edit

Details

Release Date:

6 December 2000 (Canada)  »

Filming Locations:


Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Neat episode
14 December 2011 | by (The Last New Jersey Drive-In on the Left) – See all my reviews

Dante (a typically excellent Michael Pare) arrests murderess Dr. Nasreen (a sound and sultry performance by the enticing Laura Landavier) and her browbeaten teenage son Ajit (a solid and likable portrayal by Jazz Mann). Unbeknownst to Dante, Nasreen possesses a device that can control his mind. Said device causes him to turn on Lucretia (nice work by Claudette Roche). This episode offers some nifty additional insight concerning Dante's increasing cynicism with his thankless profession as well as his conflict with Lucretia over who's really in charge. Moreover, Dr. Nasreen makes for a pleasingly shrewd, nasty, and dangerous femme fatale. However, it's the moving plight of Percy (wonderfully essayed with sparkling spunky aplomb by Tanya Allen) and her loneliness and need for companionship which give this particular outing extra poignancy and dramatic weight; the scenes between her and Ajit are quite sweet and charming. And the tragic conclusion packs a very devastating punch, too.


1 of 2 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?