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"Star Trek: Voyager" Persistence of Vision (TV Episode 1995) Poster

Trivia

The term in the title refers to the phenomenon of the eye by which even nanoseconds of exposure to an image result in milliseconds of reaction from the retina to the optic nerves.
"Bothan" is also an alien race from the Star Wars Galaxy.
The antagonist here is played by Patrick Kerr, who frequently plays characters on other shows with a serious Star Trek obsession. In fact on the show Frasier (1993) its even stated his character has a restraining order from William Shatner.
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The first time Tuvok's proficiency in playing the Vulcan lute is mentioned: Tuvok used to play the lute to his wife.
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This takes place in 2372.
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At least one of the reasons Torres and Kim work on fitting holoprojectors around Voyager in this episode is that the production team of Star Trek: Voyager had, by this point in the series' run, become fed up with The Doctor almost always being confined to sickbay.
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Persistence of vision is the phenomenon of the eye where an afterimage is thought to persist for a small fraction of a second on the retina. The belief in persistence of vision is based on the mistaken belief that human perception of motion is the result of persistence of vision. This myth probably stems from the idea that the human eye is just like a camera, when in fact there is much more to it then that. Misinterpretation of this phenomenon over several centuries has led to the persistence of this myth. One explanation may be iconic memory; but this is a subject of many arguments among different branches of the medical profession.
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"Persistence of Vision" was also the working title for the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine season two episode "Shadowplay".
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The shot of Tuvok miraculously finding himself on Vulcan incorporates a section from a matte painting that was used in Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home for its background.
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This is the third of three episodes that feature Janeway's Gothic holonovel, holosuite program Janeway Lambda one. The holonovel had originally been developed for "Eye of the Needle" but was not shown onscreen until "Cathexis".
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This is the only episode of the series to address B'Elanna Torres' attraction to Chakotay. However, the issue is additionally raised in the novel Pathways by Jeri Taylor, the same person who wrote this episode.
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The color of the warp core changes in this episode from a pinkish-blue to a whitish-blue and stays this way until the end of the series.
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This episode was nominated for an Emmy Award for Outstanding Hairstyling for a Series (along with DS9: "Our Man Bashir").
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The surreal quality of this episode was somewhat apt, considering that it first aired a day before Halloween.
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This was the first episode that James L. Conway directed after helming the feature-length fourth season opener "The Way of the Warrior" for Star Trek: Deep Space Nine.
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The Botha alien uses a Kazon ship as one of his illusory vessels. The other illusory ship is not identified. However, the oft-reused studio model for the Talarian observation craft was used for the unidentified craft here and, this time, it was redressed with a purple glow from its nacelles.
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One of three episodes during the show's first three seasons where Tom Paris remarks that an alien they've encountered on Voyager's viewscreen is either a friendly/pleasant fellow when really they're anything but; the Botha here and Jal Culluh in S1's State of Flux and Bharat in S3's Fair Trade.
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