When transporting a dangerous material to the Enterprise, Data is kidnapped and the crew is led to believe he is dead when the shuttlecraft he was piloting explodes enroute.

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Cast

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Toff
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Varria
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Kivas Fajo

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Storyline

A presumed routine transport of material from a Federation-friendly planet to the Enterprise goes suddenly wrong as the shuttle craft explodes. Android Data is presumed killed in the accident but actually finds himself kept captive on a starship by Kivas Fajo and his assistant Varria, who have an impressive collection of contraband treasures, but refuses to be a valued capture and attempts to escape. On board Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge and Wesley champion the thesis that its doesn't fit with Data's android nature after careful examination of all recordings... Written by KGF Vissers

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5 May 1990 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Among the artifacts in Fajo's collection is the communication device used by Sarjenka in "Pen Pals", and a small vase that would be seen in the crew quarters of Data, Worf, Miles O'Brien and many others in later episodes. See more »

Goofs

When Geordie wakes from the dream he is having about Data's accident, he picks up his visor, seems to look at it and turns it around then puts it on. Geordie is blind without his visor and would not be able to see it was the wrong way around. However, he can tell by touch that it is backwards without seeing it. See more »

Quotes

Kivas Fajo: If only you could... feel... rage over Varria's death... If only you could feel the need for revenge, then, maybe, you could fire. But you're... just an android. You can't feel anything, can you? It's just another interesting, intellectual puzzle for you - another of life's... curiosities.
Lt. Commander Data: I cannot allow you to continue.
[fires the disruptor]
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Connections

References Star Trek: The Next Generation: Time Squared (1989) See more »

Soundtracks

Star Trek: The Next Generation End Credits
Composed by Jerry Goldsmith and Alexander Courage
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User Reviews

 
Doesn't go far enough...
9 May 2017 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This is one of the most-memorable NextGen episodes, of any season. Watching it for the second time last night (27 years after first seeing it!), I was reminded of the series' failure (in later episodes) to develop what is introduced here.

Data is put in an untenable situation, as he doesn't know he's about to be rescued. What should he do with Kivas? * The man is a murderer **, but Data's programming will not let him kill someone except in self-defense (or immediate defense of others). So why doesn't he just give Kivas a zetz im kopf and tie him up? (He has no trouble overpowering Kivas' goons.)

Instead, he decides to kill Kivas, a fraction of second after the transporter begins operating. He "explains" the weapon's discharge by saying "something might have happened". He later tells Kivas (in a subtly ironic tone) that he "has no feelings. I am an android."

Data's programming is (presumably) sufficiently complex for his experiences to alter his behavior, and even his world view. We see this in his speaking the literal truth, twisted to cover his real "feelings". But this potential for unexpected and even self-serving behavior isn't explored in later episodes. Perhaps it was decided that the audience would not tolerate turning a sympathetic character into a potentially threatening one.

* The name appears to be a reference to the "kivas and trillium" Spock was supposed to be a dealer in.

** Saul Rubinek gives a great performance going through the "agony" of deciding whether to kill his female companion.


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