Edit
"Star Trek: The Next Generation" A Matter of Time (TV Episode 1991) Poster

Quotes

Rasmussen: So, you've made your choice after all. And without my help.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Oh, on the contrary, Professor. You were quite helpful.

Rasmussen: How's that?

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: By refusing to help me, you left me with the same choice I had to begin with, to try or not to try, to take a risk or to play it safe. And your arguments have reminded me how precious the right to choose is. Because I've never been one to play it safe.

4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Rasmussen: Who said these moments were any less exciting when you know the outcome, hm?

Lt. Commander Data: I know of no one who said that, Professor.

4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

[Rasmussen is flirting with Dr. Crusher]

Doctor Beverly Crusher: [daintily] You're not supposed to be influencing the past, remember? And I am beginning to feel just a little bit influenced. Anyway, I could be your great-great-great-great-grandmother.

4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

[Rasmussen enters Data's quarters, which are exploding with noise]

Rasmussen: [shouting] What in God's name is that?

Lt. Commander Data: Music, Professor.

Rasmussen: Music?

Lt. Commander Data: Yes, sir. Mozart's "Jupiter Symphony in C major", Bach's "Brandenburg Concerto No. 3", Beethoven's "Ninth Symphony, 2nd Movement, molto vivace", and "La Donna e Mobile", from Verdi's "Rigoletto".

Rasmussen: Do you think you could thin it out a bit?

Lt. Commander Data: Computer, eliminate program one.

[music thins, but Rasmussen shakes his head]

Lt. Commander Data: Computer, eliminate program two.

[music thins more, but is still too loud]

Lt. Commander Data: Computer, eliminate program three.

[Rasmussen gestures for him to lower the volume]

Lt. Commander Data: Computer, half volume.

Rasmussen: [still shouting] How the...!

[pauses, realizing the volume is low enough]

Rasmussen: [much quieter] How the hell can you listen to four pieces of music at the same time?

Lt. Commander Data: Actually, I am capable of distinguishing over one hundred and fifty simultaneous compositions. But in order to analyze the aesthetics, I try to keep it to ten or less.

Rasmussen: Only four today?

Lt. Commander Data: I am assisting Commander La Forge with a very complex calculation. It demands a great deal of my concentration.

3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

[Rasmussen has refused to help Picard decide on the right choice to save a people from certain death]

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: How can you be comfortable watching people die?

Rasmussen: Erm, let me... put it to you this way: if I were to tell you that none of those people died, you'd easily conclude that you tried your solution and it succeeded. So, you'd confidently try again. No harm in that. But, what if I were to tell you they all died? What then? Obviously, you'd decide not to make the same mistake twice. Now, what if one of those people grew up...

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Yes, Professor, I know. What if one of those lives I save down there is a child who grows up to be the next Adolf Hitler, or Khan Singh? Every first-year philosophy student has been asked that question since the earliest wormholes were discovered.

3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: A person's life, their future, hinges on each of a thousand choices. Living is *making* choices! Now, you ask me to believe that if I make a choice other than the one that appears in your history books, then your past will be irrevocably altered. Well... you know, Professor, perhaps I don't give a damn about your past, because your past is my future, and as far as I'm concerned, it hasn't been written yet!

3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

[despite his better judgment, Picard has asked Rasmussen about the best course of action to take in his Penthara IV dilemma]

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: There are twenty million lives down there. And you know what happened to them - what *will* happen to them.

Rasmussen: So, it seems you have another dilemma; one that questions your convictions.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Well, I've never been afraid of reevaluating my convictions, Professor; and now... well, I have twenty million reasons to do so.

3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Of course, you know of the Prime Directive - which tells us that we have no right to interfere in the natural evolution of alien worlds. Now, I have sworn to uphold it. But, nevertheless, I have disregarded that directive - on more than one occasion - because I thought it was the right thing to do! Now, if you are holding on to some... temporal equivalent of that directive, then isn't it possible that... you have an occasion here to make an exception, to... to help me to choose, because it's the right thing to do?

2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: [after Rasmussen has been exposed as an impostor] Trying to make *my* history unfold in a way other than it already has, eh, Professor?

Rasmussen: [laughing sheepishly] This was all a misunderstanding, Picard. Just... let me back in there. We'll forget the whole thing.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Now, what possible incentive could anyone offer me to allow that?

2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Lt. Commander Data: I assume your hand print will open this door, whether you are conscious or not.

2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

[Rasmussen has been revealed as an inventor from the 22nd century]

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: I'm sure that there are more than a few legitimate historians at Starfleet, who'll be quite eager to meet a human from your era.

2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

[last lines]

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Oh, Professor - welcome to the 24th century.

2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

[Worf has hailed a small vessel drifting in space]

Lieutenant Worf: That's odd...

Commander William T. Riker: What's odd?

Lieutenant Worf: We've received a response, but...

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Yes, Mr. Worf?

Lieutenant Worf: They want you to move over, sir.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Reply that the Enterprise isn't going anywhere, Lieutenant.

Lieutenant Worf: Not the Enterprise, Captain. *You*.

1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Rasmussen: Um, your... prosthesis. What do you... what do you call it again?

Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: A VISOR.

Rasmussen: VISOR, right, a VISOR! You know, I have a picture of you wearing that in my office. How do you like it?

Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: It allows me to see. I like it just fine.

Rasmussen: You know, Homer was blind. And Milton. Bach. Monet. Wonder...

1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Captain Jean-Luc Picard: Let's take a look at Mr. Worf's distortion.

1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

[Rasmussen has asked the crew to fill out questionnaires for him]

Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge: If I hand my assignment in on time, can I get a glimpse into next week's poker game?

1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Lieutenant Worf: I hate questionnaires.

1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Lieutenant Worf: [responding to an earlier question of Rasmussen] Phasers.

Rasmussen: Beg your pardon?

Lieutenant Worf: There were no phasers in the 22nd century.

Rasmussen: Ah, you see, Doctor? Our Klingon friend is a perfect example of what I was trying to tell you: he views history through the eyes of a hunter, a warrior. His passion lies in the perfection of the tools of violence. How delightfully primitive!

1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Rasmussen: But you must see that if I were to influence you, everything in this sector, in this quadrant of the galaxy, could change. History - *my* history - would unfold in a way other than it already has. Now, what possible incentive could anyone offer me to allow that to happen?

1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Rasmussen: That weapon was working yesterday...

[after trying unsuccessfully to use a phaser on Data]

1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Rasmussen: Everyone dies, Captain. It's just a question of when.

1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

See also

Trivia | Goofs | Crazy Credits | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page