Star Trek (1966–1969)
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The Menagerie: Part II 

At Spock's court martial, he explains himself with mysterious footage about when Capt. Pike was kidnapped by powerful illusion casting aliens.


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Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Captain Christopher Pike (archive footage)
Vina (archive footage)
Number One (archive footage) (as M. Leigh Hudec)
Lt. José Tyler (archive footage)
Dr. Boyce (archive footage)
Laurel Goodwin ...
Yeoman J.M. Colt (archive footage)
C.P.O. Garrison (archive footage)
Dr. McCoy (credit only)
Scott (credit only)
Uhura (voice)
Sean Kenney ...
Hagan Beggs ...


Spock's court-martial board views the video stream from Talos IV of Captain Pike's imprisonment 13 years earlier and of the Enterprise's attempts to rescue him. The Talosians, using their powers of mind-reading and illusion, place Pike in worlds from both his memory and his imagination. The one constant is Vina, the beautiful blonde survivor of a crashed Earth ship (the other half of a Talosian plan for a captive Adam and Eve). Number One's attempts to liberate Pike result in her and Yeoman Colt's capture (additional breeding stock for the Talosian plan), but when the humans and Talosians learn more of each other, the situation takes a turn neither side expects. As the Enterprise approaches Talos IV once again, Kirk and the court watch the past unfold and learn the real reason for Spock's mutiny. Written by Tom D.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


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Release Date:

24 November 1966 (USA)  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?


DeForest Kelley, James Doohan and George Takei do not appear in this episode. Nichelle Nichols does not appear on-screen but she does have several voice-over lines at the end of the episode. See more »


According to Number 1, Vina was an adult crew member of the expedition. At the end, Vina indicates that the Talosians had never seen a human, thus had no idea how to rebuild her. Why the Talosians could not have read her mind while they were rebuilding her to see how she looked prior to the crash is never explained. Also, as a crew person on a voyage of that type, I have to believe that she would have had at least rudimentary instruction in human anatomy - which the Talosians would have been able to retrieve. See more »


The Keeper: I read most strongly a recent death struggle in which it fought to protect its life. We will begin with this, giving the specimen something more interesting to protect.
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Referenced in South Park: 4th Grade (2000) See more »


Theme From Star Trek
Written by Alexander Courage
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User Reviews

Trek's First "Facepalm"
21 October 2013 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Normally, it's Picard with the Facepalms. But in this episode, it was done by the beautiful Susan Oliver.

How beautiful is she, is she really, pound for pound, more beautiful than any other woman Captain Pike had seen? Or are The Talosians reading his mind and giving Pike what Pike wants to see?

How much do The Talosians want Pike back? What will they do, what will his friends do for him? What CAN be done for him? Starfleet Medical if it existed back then, can't do a damn thing.

This is a man with only his thoughts to keep him company, he is just as alive as anyone else, he just doesn't have arms, legs, or a mouth. He can't even SPEAK to anybody to tell them what he wants.

This is the Christopher Pike that we met in the first part of this, Kirk's Predecessor and Spocks' previous Boss. But this Video we are viewing, which Spock is using to explain "Why" he Kidnapped Pike and stole The Enterprise, shows a Different Pike than the one who looks like Professor X in a Mechanized Wheelchair. We see a Vital Pike, even though he has come to a precipice of his own and is questioning his own Command abilities, as we see when the earlier Pike has a discussion with his "bartender", John Hoyt. In fact that discussion mirrors one Bones had with Kirk in Star Trek II, and it is also most probably the basis of bringing Woopi Goldberg in to The Next Generation to be a Bartender and "A Listener".

But to visit Talos IV is the only Death Penalty on Starfleet's Books, Spock not only jeopardizes himself but Kirk as well.

They have the ability to create Illusions for anyone they come in contact with, and this is why their planet is off limits. At least Starfleet thought this was the only solution 13 years prior to when this happened.

But now we see evidence that Galactic Distances are not a deterrent for their power. In fact the whole second part of this is a trick, a trick for Captain Kirk's benefit, for Spock's benefit, and mostly for Pike's.

They had their eyes on Pike 13 years ago, and that focus never wavered- They still want him, it seems that The Talosians did not need any Human, they needed Pike, Pike was the only one that could do what they needed him to do. Because he was the kind of man Vina wanted, the only man in the galaxy for her, despite the ruin of her body.

And Vina is apparently still there. It really doesn't matter what a person looks like, or even what they can or can't do. What is most important is what's in their Heart, and The Talosians are the only ones who can do anything for Pike- And for Vina.

But the Vital Pike was not ready to do this in the 13 year old Video The Talosians are transmitting, he fights them, tries to keep them out of his mind by keeping violent thoughts. And he fails, this is where Vina gives the Facepalm.

Now that I have seen The Cage several times on its own, and The Menagerie a few times, what makes it is not just The Cage on its own, it is The Cage being Inserted into the Framing Story of The Menagerie that makes it a much better story.

And the Style of The Cage is Early 60's while The Menagerie is late 60's, actually The Cage was filmed in 50's Cinematic Style, this is what made it look like one was 13 years earlier than the other.

Watching these today is almost like watching Tom Paris from Voyager's "Captain Proton" serials- This is how The Future was envisioned in the 60's- You'll see that Spocks' Library Computer Station was controlled by Hand Gestures.

In 2013, there are now hand devices that can be operated with hand movements, computers that have Touch Screens, even "Communicators" that are not much larger than those on this show, some of them even flip open.

Would we have thought of these things without Trek?

2 of 4 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

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