Edit
"Star Trek" I, Mudd (TV Episode 1967) Poster

(TV Series)

(1967)

Trivia

Jump to: Spoilers (1)
During the filming, Gene Roddenberry was in a panic because he needed at least two female identical twins and couldn't find any. Then one night while driving home he saw Alyce Andrece and Rhae Andrece walking down a street. Roddenberry literally pulled up beside them, jumped out of his car and told them that they were going to be on television!
According to Walter Koenig, NBC considered making a Harry Mudd spin-off show after the success of "I, Mudd." They assigned Gene Roddenberry to develop the idea, but being busy with Star Trek and other projects, he didn't have time for it, and the series was never conceived.
A third-season appearance of Harry Mudd was planned but axed due to the producers' desire to move away from comedy episodes. However, Roger C. Carmel would reprise the role of Mudd as a cartoon voice in Star Trek: The Animated Series: Mudd's Passion (1973). Mudd was considered for a return during the Star Trek movies in the 1980s, but Carmel's failing health nixed that.
This was Roger C. Carmel's favorite Star Trek episode.
The piece of equipment found in Norman's lab and workshop would be recycled for future episodes, appearing in the corridors of the Enterprise. Parts of the device that contained the nanopulse laser were later seen in Dr. McCoy's lab.
This episode marks George Takei's last appearance in the series until Star Trek: Return to Tomorrow (1968). During his nine episode absence, Takei was on the East Coast filming The Green Berets (1968).
David Gerrold did an uncredited rewrite on this episode. One of the significant changes he made, at Gene L. Coon's request, was to get the crew on to the planet by the end of the first act. Other notable contributions were the gag of the five hundred identical female robots, and more material relating to Stella. Coon offered to submit the script for arbitration so that Gerrold would receive credit and residuals. However, Gerrold declined as he felt it would be stealing from Stephen Kandel, who had created Harry Mudd.
The title, referring to the absurd "king" of the robots, spoofs the Robert Graves novel "I, Claudius" which is about an absurd Roman potentate.
Although there are 500 Alice models, we only see fifteen or sixteen. In order of appearance, they are: 1, 2, 66, 99, 19, 263, 118, 322, 471, 210, 27, 11, 3, 73 and 500. The number of the Alice that throws Scott into Kirk's group is too far away to read (although is does seem to be a double-digit figure.)
While searching for identical twins to play androids, casting director Joseph D'Agosta found two young girls (apparently prostitutes) walking on Hollywood Boulevard with their pet wild cat, Marlon. He brought the two girls to meet producer Gene L. Coon and associate producer Robert H. Justman. While they inspected the girls (who were ultimately deemed unsuitable for the role), Coon had to hold Marlon, which consequently scratched him with its claws and tore his entire shirt.
The first draft of the script devoted more attention to Norman's act of diverting the Enterprise to Mudd, with the crew only arriving at the end of the second act. After an examination revealed Norman as an android, Scotty expressed an urge to take Norman apart - quickly adding that it was "nothing personal." Norman understood.
This takes place in 2268.
At the end, when Mudd is reviewing the various androids (before the appearance of the Stella androids), two female androids in green dresses appear to be wearing the same dress as Ruth (Maggie Thrett) in Star Trek: Mudd's Women (1966).
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Using identical twins for each android "series" aided the photographic-effects budget for the episode. With imaginative use of twins and split screens, as many as six of one model were shown at once, while two of the same model required nothing but an additional costume. This ultimately gave the illusion of a planet of thousands of androids.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
At approximately five minutes and 35 seconds, this episode's teaser is the longest in the original series.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
David Gerrold did an uncredited rewrite of the screenplay, his first contribution to the series. Gerrold lives on in Star Trek legend as the writer of one of the series' most iconic episodes, Star Trek: The Trouble with Tribbles (1967).
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The Annabelle series android is wearing the costume originally worn by Marlys Burdette in "Wolf in the Fold".
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The Trudy series android is wearing a costume worn by an Argelian woman in the episode "Wolf in the Fold".
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The Maisie series and the Barbara series androids are wearing costumes left over from "Mudd's Women", worn by Karen Steele and Maggie Thrett respectively.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Stella Mudd is wearing a dress (with slight modifications), which was seen on Martha Leighton (Natalie Norwick) in "The Conscience of the King".
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The body suits worn by the male androids were later reused on Bele and Lokai in "Let That Be Your Last Battlefield".
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
With the exception of those actors who played members of the Enterprise crew, Roger C. Carmel was the only actor to play the same character in more than one episode of the series.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
This episode marks one of four times Kirk is able to "talk a computer to death". This skill is also used in "The Changeling", "The Return of the Archons", and "The Ultimate Computer" (with an honorable mention going to "What Are Little Girls Made Of?", in which Kirk's arguments get Ruk the android so riled up he suicidally attacks Korby).
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

When Scotty finally shows up, the Alice android indicates that he is the last one of the crew to be beamed down to the planet. With a crew of over 400 people, it is never explained how all of them can be present on the planet and yet only the six principles (Kirk, Spock, McCoy, Scotty, Uhura, and Chekov) are the only humans (other than Harry Mudd) visible and working to defeat the androids during the 'incarceration' period.
3 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page