The Sopranos (1999–2007)
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Sentimental Education 

Carmela has another furtive romance collapse, while Tony B. throws away a chance to turn his life around.

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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
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Dr. Jennifer Melfi (credit only)
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Junior Soprano (credit only)
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Meadow Soprano (as Jamie-Lynn DiScala)
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Bobby 'Bacala' Baccalieri (as Steven R. Schirripa)
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Henry Yuk ...
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Storyline

Tony Blundetto is working hard preparing for his masseur exams. He's also proving to be pretty lucky as well. His current employer, Sungyon Kim, is impressed with his dedication and offers to front the cost of opening a massage parlor with Tony in charge. Then while out for a walk with his wife, he sees a bag thrown from a speeding car in which he finds $12,000. Setting up a business however is proving to be more of a challenge than he expected. He turns to Tony. Carmela's relationship with Wegler has gone to the next step but she is shocked when he breaks it off suddenly accusing her of just using him to get better grades for AJ. Written by garykmcd

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gangster | See All (1) »

Genres:

Crime | Drama

Certificate:

TV-MA | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

11 April 2004 (USA)  »

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1.78 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This is the only episode of the series directed by director-turned-actor Peter Bogdanovich. Once one of the most acclaimed, successful 'New Wave" directors of the 1970s, by the time the The Sopranos (1999) began in the late 1990s, he seemed content to settle for acting, appearing in 13 episodes of the series as psychiatrist Elliot Kupferberg. See more »

Goofs

When Tony B. is breaking down the wall with a sledgehammer, he hits it once, then twice and the hole is much bigger, then when the camera goes to the kids then back to the wall, it is the first hole, the smaller one. See more »

Quotes

Silvio Dante: [of Tony Blundetto's finding a large bag of cash] From now on, when anybody steps in a pile of shit, it will be known as a "Blundetto"!
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Connections

References West Side Story (1961) See more »

Soundtracks

The Break Up Song (They Don't Write em)
Performed by Greg Kihn
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User Reviews

 
Bogdanovich, back on form
16 May 2008 | by (Italy) – See all my reviews

Joining the cast of The Sopranos as Dr. Elliot Kupfenberg proved to be one of the smartest moves of Peter Bogdanovich's career, which had practically sunk after the disappointing experience of Texasville; and though his acting gig in the series is extremely enjoyable, he is best known as a director, which is why it is a particular joy to see him behind the camera again, bringing the sixth episode of Season Five to the screen. Needless to say, like another major guest director, Steve Buscemi, who also took on acting duties on the show, he succeeds beautifully.

With a title like Sentimental Education, the story can't possibly focus on violent crime, and indeed it doesn't: the core of the script is Carmela Soprano's ongoing affair with Robert Wegler (David Strathairn), frowned upon by Father Phil (Paul Sculze, always good) but wholeheartedly enjoyed by the two lovers, at least until Robert has the brilliant idea to ask a teacher of AJ's to be less hard on the kid and, when said request isn't satisfied, takes it out on Carmela.

As a matter of fact, this episode is less The Sopranos, more Sex and the City: cracking characterizations, witty, explicit dialogue and a pay-off to die for. Then again, Bogdanovich has always favored traditional drama over hard-boiled violence, so a departure of sorts from the conventional format isn't totally unpredicted. Of course, this being The Sopranos, something brutal has to happen, and the show doesn't disappoint on those terms, with a hilarious yet shocking change of mind for Buscemi's character, the apparently reformed Tony Blundetto, whose new actions serve as a delicious appetizer for the second half of the season. Yummy.


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