The Sopranos (1999–2007)
8.8/10
1,702
3 user

From Where to Eternity 

Chris awakens from his coma with a message for Tony and Paulie. Carmela, meanwhile, wants Tony to take a cut.

Director:

(as Henry J. Bronchtein)

Writers:

(created by),
Reviews

Watch Now

With Prime Video

WATCH NOW
Edit

Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
...
...
Junior Soprano (credit only)
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
Livia Soprano (credit only)
...
Edit

Storyline

Christopher is in hospital after the shooting but goes into cardiac arrest and must undergo emergency surgery. The surgery goes well but the doctor admits that Christopher was clinically dead for about one minute. When he awakens from his surgery, Christopher believes he had a out of body experience and saw his father and uncle playing cards in hell. They tell him that's where he's headed, and when he awakens he's convinced he's going to hell. After Carmella hears that another gangster's girlfriend gave birth, she decides Tony should have vasectomy. Pussy tells his FBI contact that he thinks Tony is onto him so he sets out to find the man who shot Christopher in the hopes that it will bring them closer together Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

gangster | See All (1) »

Genres:

Crime | Drama

Certificate:

TV-MA | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

12 March 2000 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Though usually the show features just diegetic musics and songs, in this episode there's a massive use of Otis Redding's "My Lover's Prayer" as a non-diegetic theme. See more »

Quotes

Christopher Moltisanti: I'm going to hell, T.
Anthony 'Tony' Soprano Sr.: You're not going anywheres but home.
Christopher Moltisanti: I crossed over to the other side.
Anthony 'Tony' Soprano Sr.: You what?
Christopher Moltisanti: I saw the tunnel. And the white light. I saw my father in hell.
Paulie 'Walnuts' Gualtieri: Get the fuck outta here!
Christopher Moltisanti: And the bouncer said that I'd be there, too, when my time comes.
Paulie 'Walnuts' Gualtieri: What bouncer?
Christopher Moltisanti: The Emerald Piper. That's our hell. It's an Irish bar where it's St. Patrick's Day every day forever.
See more »

Connections

Edited into The Sopranos: Bust-Out (2000) See more »

Soundtracks

King Nothing
Written by James Hatfield (as Hetfield), Lars Ulrich (as Ulrich) and Kirk Hammett (as Hammett)
Performed by Metallica
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Three o'clock
4 April 2008 | by (Italy) – See all my reviews

That The Sopranos was more complex than the usual gangster story was clear right off the bat, and its will to explore new, unseen territories for the genre emerged clearly in Season 1, Episode 8, where Christopher (Michael Imperioli) engaged in a dream-based conversation with a guy he'd killed in the pilot. Few people, however, expected an episode like From Where to Eternity, written by Imperioli: a soulful (pun not intended) meditation on the afterlife, blood-riddled climax apart.

The aftermath of the previous episode's shootout sees Christopher struggle for his life, while all those around him swear revenge on who did it: Sean Gismonte died during the assault, but Matt Bevilaqua (Lillo Brancato) is still at large, which angers Chrissy' mom beyond imagination. "When you find him, I want him to suffer." she tells Silvio. "You hear me, Sil? I want that motherf*cker in agony!" The answer? "Don't worry, we'll do the best we can." And oddly enough, that cold comment gets the audience's sympathy, perhaps because Chris has evolved into one of the show's most likable characters, despite his occasional bouts of psychotic rage. On a quieter front, meanwhile, Carmela asks Tony to get a vasectomy, since she is tired of hearing of mobsters whose mistresses give birth to illegitimate children. The boss is naturally angered by the proposition, but doesn't give it much thought as he wants to avenge his nephew and enlists Pussy to help him.

A huge fan of old-school gangster flicks (as shown by his characterization of Christopher), Imperioli provides a clever reinterpretation of the classic revenge theme, using his opportunity in the writer's chair to fuse bloodshed and spirituality in a perfect package of great television. Chris's discussion with Tony and Paulie about the possible out-of-body experience he had while in a coma is one of the serial's most poignant scenes, especially when Paulie tries to comfort his young friend by saying he didn't see Hell, but Purgatory - before jokingly adding he will probably have to spend 6,000 years in that place. Considering the overall darkness of the series, that moment also has an eerily foreboding quality, as confirmed by the grim sequence where Matt receives his comeuppance. Don't let the apparently consolatory epilogue fool you: few shows analyze evil in its purest form with an eye as uncompromising as that of The Sopranos.


21 of 23 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page