After holding a surprise tribute to Principal Skinner, the town of Springfield is shocked to find out that Seymour Skinner is actually an impostor.

Director:

(as Steve Moore)

Writers:

(created by), (developed by) | 6 more credits »
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On TV

Airs Fri. Jun. 03, 7:00 PM on FXX

ON DISC

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Cast

Episode cast overview:
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Marge Simpson (voice)
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Lisa Simpson (voice)
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Mrs. Krabappel (voice)
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Agnes Skinner (voice)
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Miss Hoover (voice)
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Storyline

After holding a surprise tribute to Principal Skinner, the town of Springfield is shocked to find out that Seymour Skinner is actually an impostor.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Animation | Comedy

Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »
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Details

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Language:

Release Date:

28 September 1997 (USA)  »

Filming Locations:


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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

During his introduction on the season 9 DVD, creator Matt Groening admitted that this is one of his least favorite Simpsons episodes. See more »

Goofs

At the station, the railroad has no ballast. See more »

Quotes

Abe Simpson: [to Agnes] Hello Beautiful.
Agnes Skinner: In your dreams!
Abe Simpson: We'll see about that!
[He falls asleep]
Abe Simpson: [Talking in his dream] Hello Beautiful.
See more »

Connections

References The Prince and the Pauper (1937) See more »

Soundtracks

The Stars and Stripes Forever
(uncredited)
Composed by John Philip Sousa
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User Reviews

 
Outrage fades with time, but humor is a constant
27 October 2009 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This was a pretty contentious episode when it came out, much like Homer's Enemy. And that's exactly what it was supposed to be -- a conspiracy against the fans, a giant screw- you, "in canon," but with a big wipeout at the end so that nothing really changed. This was a bold move that was well executed, and yet somehow fell short of communicating itself to the bulk of the audience.

We've got a story where a minor character in the lives of Springfieldianites is revealed to have a history that's shockingly different than they had understood, though his personality remains unchanged. This leads to outrage and finally a complete rejection of the truth because it's too unsettling.

Hey -- if this episode makes you outraged and uncomfortable, you might be from Springfield!

You see -- it's all a commentary on how easy it is to love a lie. On how constancy is such a necessity in our lives that we'd rather embrace a familiar falsehood than accept the truth.

Maybe that's too meta for TV -- but who gives a spit, this episode is also funny as hell, well paced, well written and highly emotive. And tucked inside is a cogent exploration of complex relationships. It could be the smartest episode in the series' history.

Now let us never speak of it again -- under penalty of torture!


14 of 26 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

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