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"The Simpsons" A Streetcar Named Marge (TV Episode 1992) Poster

Trivia

This is the last episode to be produced by Klasky-Csuop company. All animation from this point on has been by Film Roman company.
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Many people objected to the lyrics in the New Orleans song from the episode "A Streetcar Named Marge". In response to this, Bart's lines on the chalkboard the next week read "I will not defame New Orelans."
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Mrs. Sinclair is reading "The Fountainhead Diet," a reference to Ayn Rand's novel The Fountainhead. A poster in the daycare center reads "A is A," which is the title of the last section of Atlas Shrugged. Another poster, "Helping is Futile," crudely reflects her rejection of altruism.
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This was not the last time the series would reference Ayn Rand, especially in the context of Maggie's daycare. In The Simpsons: Four Great Women and a Manicure (2009), Maggie was portrayed as "Maggie Roark," based on Howard Roark, the hero of The Fountainhead. The theatrical short The Longest Daycare (2012) has Maggie returning to the Ayn Rand Day Care Center, as does the couch gag from "Moonshine River".
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Ayn Rand reportedly despised the works of Tennessee Williams. This episode references both of them.
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Marlon Brando, who played Stanley the definitive movie adaptation of the play A Streetcar Named Desire (1951), was shown this episode by Edward Norton while filming The Score (2001). According to Norton, Brando loved it.
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During the scene where Maggie misses her pacifier, she picks up many items. They include: her thumb, a crayon, a block, and a toy figure which resembles Bart.
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Ayn Rand Daycare is named after novelist Ayn Rand, who wrote 'The Fountainhead' and 'Atlas Shrugged'.
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Alf Clausen secured the rights to the score to The Great Escape (1963), along with the original orchestra charts. It had been Jeff Martin's favorite film as a child, and he said "it was so exciting and so stirring" to hear the music being performed by the Simpsons' studio orchestra.
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The episode was conceived about two years before it aired on television.
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The episode posed a challenge to the show's animation directors. It contains many long set pieces, especially during the third and final act, which includes the end of the Maggie subplot and the performance of the musical. Several scenes required the animators to draw dozens of background characters. Rich Moore, the head director, initially feared the episode would not be completed in time. David Silverman, the supervising director, also had doubts; according to Jeff Martin, Moore sent back a cartoon of himself reading the script with his eyes popping out and his jaw dropped. Al Jean said that Moore "worked himself to death" to produce the episode's most elaborate sequences.
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Following the episode, the Ayn Rand Society called Matt Groening to say they were amazed at the references to Rand. They also asked him if the show was making fun of them.
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According to the DVD commentary, Phillip Sinclair's bombastic introductory speech was actually the "smallest" take that Jon Lovitz did.
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Jeff Martin first pitched the idea of Homer being in a theatrical production of 1776. James L. Brooks then suggested that Marge could play Blanche DuBois in A Streetcar Named Desire. Brooks saw that Marge's relationship with Homer was similar to Blanche's relationship with Stanley, and he wanted to use that fact to build the emotional arc for an episode.
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The estate of Tennessee Williams would not let the show use large excerpts from A Streetcar Named Desire, since the work was copyrighted. However, Fox lawyer Anatole Klebanow said that original songs based on the play were acceptable. According to producer Mike Reiss, Klebanow even promised to "take [their] case to the Supreme Court to get [the] episode aired." Jeff Martin later explained that while the songs made the episode funnier, they also made it harder to write.
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A number of scenes that appeared in the storyboard and animatic were reordered or dropped altogether in the final version of the episode. Much of the Maggie subplot, for example, was modified before the episode aired. A scene in which the babies lock Ms. Sinclair in her office is missing from the final version of the episode.
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All the main cast members lent their voices to the episode, along with semi-regulars Maggie Roswell and Phil Hartman. Assistant producer Lona Williams also had a minor speaking role.
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Matt Groening has listed this episode as one of his own favorites, calling the subplot "Maggie's finest moment".
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James L. Brooks listed the episode as one of his favorites, saying it "showed we could go into areas no one thought we could go into".
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This is the last episode to have the full end credits theme song.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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