Seinfeld (1989–1998)
7.8/10
1,322
3 user 2 critic

The Stakeout 

Jerry and George stake out the lobby of an office building to find a woman Jerry met at a party but whose name and phone number he didn't get.

Director:

Writers:

(created by), (created by) | 2 more credits »
Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
...
...
...
...
Lynn Clark ...
Philip Bruns ...
Dad (as Phil Bruns)
...
Mom
Maud Winchester ...
Pamela
William Fair ...
Roger
Ron Steelman ...
Artie
Joe George ...
Uncle Mac
...
...
Woman
Edit

Storyline

Elaine drags Jerry to a birthday dinner for one of her friends where he meets an attractive woman. He promptly forgets her name and refuses to ask Elaine who she is but remembers where she works. Jerry's parents are in town to go to a family wedding and his Dad suggests he stake-out the lobby around lunchtime. George tags along but they can't quite seem to get their stories straight. Elaine hears about it making them both uncomfortable. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

31 May 1990 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

4:3
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Philip Sterling was originally cast as Jerry's father, Morty, but was replaced with Philip Bruns. Bruns was later replaced in the second season by Barney Martin because it was decided the character should be more cranky. When the show went into syndication, Larry David wanted to reshoot Bruns's scenes with Martin but decided against the idea because the differences in the cast's ages would be noticeable. See more »

Goofs

In the video store scene, extras are seen stepping down from the front of the stage. See more »

Quotes

Jerry: [small talk] So, do you date immature men.
Vanessa: Almost exclusively.
See more »

Connections

References Far North (1988) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
"Art Core... velay"
6 November 2007 | by (Italy) – See all my reviews

The Stakeout can be considered the proper start of Seinfeld, as the pilot had no Elaine and the other characters, bar Jerry, weren't that well defined, and boy, does it deliver: while most shows, especially sitcoms, improve in later seasons (even cult phenomenon Happy Days had a few sub-par moments in its first year), the series "about nothing" started superbly and never lost its edge over the course of 175 episodes.

This is the episode where Elaine Benes (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) makes her first appearance, and in true Seinfeld fashion her debut doesn't go unnoticed: she and Jerry have a nice chat in a video store, discussing whether they should go to a dinner and telling a "dirty" joke that was pretty bold for 1991 (the stand-up comedian imagines a porn star's father referring to his son as a "public fornicator"). Subsequently, Jerry goes home to find his parents using his couch as a bed (priceless) and then attends the aforementioned dinner, where he meets a woman he is quite attracted to ("Do you date immature men?" "Almost exclusively"). Regrettably, he doesn't remember her name (Vanessa), nor did he ask for her phone number. All he remembers is the name of the law firm where she works (Sagman, Bennet, Robbins, Oppenheim and Taft - try forgetting THAT!), meaning he and George have to wait for her outside the building pretending they popped up by chance.

Taking everything that made The Seinfeld Chronicles excellent and fine-tuning it, Larry David and the protagonist define the formula that would make the series immortal: brilliant dialogue about rubbish topics (women using cheques), Jerry's monologues between one scene and the next, and one key moment for each cast member. In the case of this episode, the highlights are the bits featuring Kramer and George: the former shows up to play scrabble with Helen and Morty Seinfeld and invents the word "quone" (as in "to quone something"), while the latter, having to make up an excuse for him and Jerry being outside Vanessa's office, spawns one of the show's best recurring gags ("Art Vandelay. I'm an architect").

In short, The Stakeout is a quintessential Seinfeld episode: clever, well-written and, most of all, endlessly funny. A classic.


6 of 8 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
Newman in court Cali_Illusionz
Looking for an episode pammyers299
You don't know what it's like in there! Pleasant_Pineapple
Did you svalinalana
You look scrumptious... Matt-nicholson-246-892076
It's all relative... Beau29
Discuss The Stakeout (1990) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?