Seinfeld (1989–1998)
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The Finale 

After George and Jerry land a production deal with NBC, the four head out for Paris on NBC's private plane and are waylaid in a small Massachusetts town.

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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
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Newman
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Estelle Constanza
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Mr. Pitt
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Mrs. Choate
Peter Blood ...
Jay Crespi
David Byrd ...
Tony Carlin ...
Co-worker
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Storyline

Five years after he and George made their original pitch, Jerry gets a call from NBC saying they want to go ahead with the original proposal. As a perk, they offer him the company jet to take him anywhere he likes and he, Elaine, George and Kramer are soon winging their way to Paris. They don't get very far when the plane has to make an emergency landing - thanks to Kramer's water-logged ear - and soon find themselves with a few hours to kill in a small town. When they see a fat man being car-jacked, they make fun of it but are soon arrested under a new Good Samaritan law for failing to help him. Written by garykmcd

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Comedy

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Release Date:

14 May 1998 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In the original airing of the episode, when the private jet was going down, Elaine says to Jerry, "There's something I always wanted to tell you." Jerry replies that he does as well. Elaine or Jerry then says, "I always loved u...." then the plane starts to straighten out and the statement is never completed. Later, when confronted with what they were going to say Elaine or Jerry says, "I always loved....U..nited Airlines." These exchanges were deleted from syndication for some reason. See more »

Goofs

While Jerry, George, Elaine, and Kramer are witnessing the robbery of the Massachusettian, the reflection of the police officer is visible in the store window just over Kramer's left shoulder. The officer is waiting for his cue to join the scene but has inadvertently already made his appearance; had his visibility been intentional, he too would have been guilty of breaking the Good Samaritan Law because he was idly watching the robbery. See more »

Quotes

Lippman: [Deleted scene] So based on Ms. Benes' recommendation, Mr. Costanza came to work with me.
D.A. Hoyt: And then what happened?
[Cuts to flashback, then to present day]
D.A. Hoyt: Now, let's add sexual harassment to the laundry list.
Jackie Chiles: Harassment? The only person being harassed is my client! Since when is it illegal to have sexual intercourse with a maintenance worker?
Judge Arthur Vandelay: Sit down, Mr. Chiles! Next time, I'll charge you with contempt.
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Connections

References Today (1952) See more »

Soundtracks

Seinfeld Theme Song
Written by Jonathan Wolff
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User Reviews

 
Note to writers: Viewers hate clip shows!
10 February 2014 | by See all my reviews

IT is unfathomable that Larry David thought it was a good idea to treat the much hyped and highly anticipated finale as a clip show. Clips shows are the most hated episodes of any series. Sure, in the early days of TV, it might have been useful to catch new viewers up on what they missed in past seasons. But prior to the finale, Seinfeld had been on at least twice a day in all cities in syndication. Everyone had seen these clips hundreds of times already. And to make things worse, prior to the finale, NBC aired a 1 hour CLIP SHOW. So Larry David gave us a clip show followed by a clip show.

Granted, that was not the only reason why the finale was awful. The concept of the finale was awful. Even if such a law existed, expecting unarmed civilians to try to stop a mugger with a gun is ridiculous, even by Seinfeld standards. And for a show that claimed to be about nothing, this was the most convoluted sit-com plot ever.

But had they simply had all the previous guest stars come back for the trial and just TALK about the old episode, without actually turning it into a clip show, I think maybe the reaction to the show wouldn't have been QUITE as bad. It still would have sucked, sure. But it wouldn't be widely regarded as one of, if not THE worst series finale in TV history. And it earned that distinction.


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