Seinfeld (1989–1998)
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The Bubble Boy 

On their way to the family cabin, George and Susan visit a boy who lives in a bubble; Kramer and Naomi start a fire that ends up burning down the cabin.

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(created by), (created by) | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
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Heidi Swedberg ...
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Mel
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Mother
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Waitress
Jon Hayman ...
Donald (voice)
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Man #1
Tony Papenfuss ...
Man #2 (as Tony Pappenfuss)
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Storyline

George and Susan invite Jerry, his girlfriend Naomi, Elaine and Kramer to spend the weekend at her parents' cabin upstate. Naomi bows out after Jerry makes a comment on her laugh and Kramer isn't interested. After Elaine goads him into it, Jerry agrees to stop off on the way and visit a fan who lives in a plastic bubble enclosed room due to an autoimmune disease. They go in separate cars and George drives so fast that Jerry and Elaine lose them and not having the boy's address end up in a diner. Kramer and Naomi meanwhile decide to go to the cabin with unfortunate results. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

7 October 1992 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

4:3
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Did You Know?

Trivia

According to George Shapiro, the show received negative letters from real-life "bubble boys" and their families because of this episode. See more »

Goofs

After fleeing the mob at the Bubble Boy's house, on the way to the cabin, firetrucks are seen passing George, Susan, Jerry and Elaine. Somehow they all arrive at the cabin before the fire truck gets there, even though the fire truck passed them on the highway. See more »

Quotes

Voice and Arm of Donald Sanger, the Bubble Boy: The Moors.
George Costanza: I'm sorry the answer we were looking for was "Moops."
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Connections

References The Tonight Show with Jay Leno (1992) See more »

Soundtracks

Seinfeld Theme Song
Written by Jonathan Wolff
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User Reviews

 
"He lives in a bubble!"
24 September 2010 | by See all my reviews

After a relatively normal start of the season, the "show about nothing" pitches one of its silliest, and therefore most brilliant stories, courtesy of another exquisite collaboration between Larry David and the Emmy-winning Larry Charles (The Fix-Up, back in Season 3), who again use very dark humor to cover a more serious subject (an approach which resulted in some angry reactions at the time of the original broadcast).

The original premise is that Jerry, George, Elaine and Susan Ross (Heidi Swedberg), an NBC employee who's secretly dating Costanza, have planned to go to a cabin in the woods, belonging to Susan's parents. Before they leave, Jerry and Elaine meet a man (Brian Doyle-Murray, Bill's brother), who asks the comedian to come visit his son, a sick boy who's forced to live inside a plastic "bubble". Unfortunately, Jerry gets lost on the way, and George and Susan end up meeting the bubble boy in his place. As for the cabin... Well, let's just say Kramer comes along...

Proving that no subject, no matter how delicate, is untouchable in comedy, David and Charles take a very serious and real topic (which also inspired a Jake Gyllenhaal-starring movie) and turn it into the perfect playground for their comedic mischief, here depicted best in George's open conflict with the bubble boy over a game of Trivial Pursuit. In fact, this is really a George episode, as he hijacks all the best scenes, from a hilarious phone message he leaves on Jerry's machine to the impeccably timed ending, making for 20 minutes of non-stop laughs. Oh, and just so we're clear: it's "Moors", not "Moops".


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