Mike tries to prove that a woman's drowning was not accidental.

Director:

(as Johnny Florea)
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
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Police Lt. Tom Quinn (as Peter Hanson)
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Tyler
Zale Parry ...
Maria Tyler
Jon Lindbergh ...
Elvin - Police Officer
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Storyline

The police ask Mike for his thoughts on a man whose wife didn't resurface after photographing a shipwreck. The husband says she simply went deeper than she could handle. Examining the couple's photos, Mike realizes the man's lying. To get a confession, Mike fools him into believing they can retrieve her body from 500 feet down. Written by Jay Phelps <jaynashvil@aol.com>

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Genres:

Action | Adventure

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Release Date:

23 August 1958 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

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Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

 
Dumb Murderer
21 January 2017 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Two interesting aspects of this episode. One, the actor portraying the police lieutenant coughs uncontrollably in the first scene, but covers it with some decent ad lib dialogue (I guess the director opted not to re-shoot the scene; remember, this was in the days of film, not video). And two, Tyler (frequent series guest star Leonard Nimoy) should have seen he was being set up right from the start.

While Sea Hunt was based on then relatively-new SCUBA technology, the series made an earnest effort to incorporate real science into the show (perhaps reflecting the U.S. obsession with Sputnik and space exploration at the time). So we learned about nitrogen narcosis, re-breathers, helium-oxygen mixtures, midget submarines and other neat stuff throughout the series, although in this episode Mike's "gas-absorbing" pill was a tad artificial. Anyway, justice prevailed once again, as it invariably did on 1950s television.


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