Sanford and Son (1972–1977)
7.7/10
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Fred Sings the Blues 

Aspiring songwriter Fred invites B.B. King to dinner, but panics upon reading in the blues legend's biography that the singer has sworn to get even with the man who long ago stole his St. ... See full summary »

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Cast

Episode cast overview:
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...
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B.B. King
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Don Bexley ...
Raymond Allen ...
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Edmond
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Maitre'd
Hannah Dean ...
Woman
Harold 'Happy' Hairston ...
Man (as Happy Hairston)
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Storyline

Aspiring songwriter Fred invites B.B. King to dinner, but panics upon reading in the blues legend's biography that the singer has sworn to get even with the man who long ago stole his St. Louis sweetheart "E.W.", a woman matching Elizabeth's description. Written by Gary R. Peterson

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Comedy

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Release Date:

18 March 1977 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Esther and Elizabeth's maiden name was Winfield, and their father was a shoemaker in St. Louis. See more »

Goofs

B.B. King, playing himself, could not have interacted with Esther or Elizabeth in the 1930s in St. Louis. King was born in 1925 and did not leave the Mississippi Delta until the mid-1940s. See more »

Quotes

Fred G. Sanford: [Upon the arrival of Esther and Woodrow] Just what I needed. A wino and a rhino.
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Connections

References Jaws (1975) See more »

Soundtracks

St. Louis Blues
(uncredited)
Written by W.C. Handy
Performed by B.B. King, Don Bexley, LaWanda Page,
and Redd Foxx
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User Reviews

 
Blues great B.B. King plays himself
13 December 2016 | by (Youngstown,Ohio) – See all my reviews

"Fred Sings the Blues" has Fred writing love songs like "Life is Just a Bowl of Warm Menudo" and "I Left My Heart in El Segundo," all of which are ridiculed by Lamont, who delivers a surprise for Father's Day, two tickets to see B.B. (Blues Boy) King perform at the Club Lucifer (he sings "How Blue Can You Get"). Sanford and Son invite him over for a pleasant evening with 'down home folks,' which he happily accepts, offering his autobiography for Fred to read. The most shocking detail is learning that a certain woman named 'E. Winfield' broke his heart in St. Louis and married a man going into business in California, so Fred assumes that she was Elizabeth and that B.B. King is coming to kill him! It's perhaps an even greater surprise when the woman turns out to be Aunt Esther, as Uncle Woody (Raymond Allen, last of nine) was her betrothed, receiving a check for $1000 from a grateful King, who otherwise might never have left Missouri to earn fame and fortune. The finale has Fred, Bubba, and Esther joining the artist on stage for their rendition of "St. Louis Blues." As the penultimate episode we learn a great deal of family background, making for one of the final season's most enjoyable highlights.


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