Tod and Buz, vacationing in Malibu, California, are drawn into the world of a paranoid Progressive Jazz trumpeter and his wife. Told largely in flashback by Buz, beginning innocently enough... See full summary »

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Episode complete credited cast:
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Jana Johnson
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Gabe Johnson
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Lieutenant Mangano
Barbara Bostock ...
Kitty Parker
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Storyline

Tod and Buz, vacationing in Malibu, California, are drawn into the world of a paranoid Progressive Jazz trumpeter and his wife. Told largely in flashback by Buz, beginning innocently enough with Buz having made a connection with lounge songstress Kitty Parker. Written by dubchi

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Adventure

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Release Date:

20 January 1961 (USA)  »

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(Westrex Recording System)

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Jo Ann Greer (most famous as one of Rita Hayworth's dubbers) provides the singing voice for "Kitty Parker". See more »

Soundtracks

A Sunday Kind of Love
(uncredited)
Written by Barbara Belle, Anita Leonard, Louis Prima, Stanley Rhodes
Performed by Jo Ann Greer
The character of Kitty Parker is singing the song at the club while Buz is alone drinking champagne
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User Reviews

1/20/61: "Play it Glissando"
10 April 2015 | by (N Syracuse NY) – See all my reviews

This is one of the better episodes of this show. It has two of my favorite actors, Jack Lord and Anne Francis in a good story. Lord is a legendary trumpet player whom everybody knows of and think they know but when not blowing his horn, he's an emotional weakling. He's alternately obsessively loving and abusively angry with his wife, (Francis). She hides in the beach house the boys have rented. They think she's crazy in saying she fears her husband wants to kill her, especially when they find out her husband is this beloved figure. Eventually they are driving away with her in the 'vette when Lord shoots at them with a rifle form a ridge, (a scene that weirdly seems to anticipate the Kennedy assassination ). The bullet hits Tod, who is driving but he manages to stop the car safely. The police go looking for Lord, as do Buz and the wife. They find him on stage, playing the blues.

The theme here: that we don't know what a beloved public figure is really like certainly resonates today but was an unusual subject for a TV episode at the time. Wife abusers were generally shown as drunken, disreputable guys nobody liked.

There's no indication of or even mention of Tod recovering from a rifle bullet in any subsequent episode. A little continuity might have been nice but the producers probably reasoned that the episodes would not necessarily be shown in the same order on reruns or in syndication so why bother? Of course, that would become a problem with George Maharis' subsequent difficulties. Maharis notes that one of his disagreements with the producers was that in one episode Buz was supposed to say he doesn't know anything about music. He pointed out that in a previous episode he was supposed to be an expert on the subject. I'm betting that this was the previous episode and that "Good Night Sweet Blues" from the second season as the subsequent episode.


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