Rome (2005–2007)
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The Stolen Eagle 

In Gaul in 52 B.C., two Roman soldiers, Legionary Titus Pullo and Centurion Lucius Vorenus, are tasked with recovering Julius Caesar's personal Eagle, stolen from his camp in the dead of ... See full summary »

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Cast

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Octavia of the Julii
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Niobe
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Posca
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Eleni
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Storyline

In Gaul in 52 B.C., two Roman soldiers, Legionary Titus Pullo and Centurion Lucius Vorenus, are tasked with recovering Julius Caesar's personal Eagle, stolen from his camp in the dead of night. With his campaign in Gaul coming to a successful conclusion, Caesar's popularity is continuing to grow. He's saddened however when he receives news from his good friend Pompey Magnus that his daughter, Pompey's wife, has died in childbirth. In the Senate, Pompey must defend the prolonged absence of his friend and co-Consul Caesar against charges of corruption and of waging an illegal war. It's all a ruse however as he is plotting to eliminate him. Meanwhile, Atia of the Julii sends her son Octavian to Gaul deliver a gift of a beautiful stallion to his great uncle Julius Caesar. He is taken prisoner along the way. Fortunately, Vorenus and Pullo rescue him and as a result, both receive Caesar's favor. Written by garykmcd

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TV-MA | See all certifications »

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Release Date:

28 August 2005 (USA)  »

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1.78 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Cato and Pompey were not only close friends, but former comrades-in-arms. Caesar had once served under Pompey's command. See more »

Goofs

The first emperor of Rome was originally named "Gaius Octavius". When he was adopted by his great-uncle, he became "Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus". That adoption only took place with the reading of Caesar's will. Nobody, not even his mother Atia in a moment of wishful thinking, would have addressed him as "Octavian" prior to that event. See more »

Quotes

Mark Antony: Lucius Vorenus! You have a brain! Or so the tribune's say...
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Soundtracks

Rome Main Title Theme
(uncredited)
Written by Jeff Beal
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User Reviews

 
Top notch visuals and acting ; twisted story and characters ; captivating historical period and irresistible entertainment
20 December 2009 | by See all my reviews

Back when its first season was airing Rome was praised for its high-end and polished production. But this episode also proved the show had more to offer than impressive sets and well designed costumes. So beside a believable Ancient Rome the story was also quite interesting and intriguing. The Stolen Eagle arc was just an excuse to introduce us to the numerous and charismatic characters. However it was far from anecdotic as the events developed connections and gave birth to new relationships. Of course it focused on the two male protagonists but the other characters also had an important role to play. It was fascinating to see what some of them were capable of doing to meet their own agenda, even manipulating their loved ones and betraying supposed great friends. In some way they reminded me of the show The Tudors but I found the acting more convincing and their stories far less superficial.

The battle at the beginning was intense and brutal but too short and less bloody than in films like Braveheart. However I didn't mind its graphic violence level as it was more about covering the fundamental differences between the protagonists. One acted more like a happy drunken berserker, the other was more rational and responsible. In fact the contrast between them was also palpable in other elements. For example the dialogs weren't all black and white as they offered a second lecture to the careful viewers. One minute some character was defending the Republic, the next it was setting traps against it. In one scene it was also brilliant to use a young boy to lecture two veteran soldiers about what was really going on. So it wasn't just about the physical strength, it was also a lot about the mind, education and strategy. An other scene I really enjoyed was the one where the Eagle was actually stolen. It was dark, dynamic, unexpected and nearly mystic. In fact it wasn't the only one and a few others should surprise you as well. After all the astonishing opening credits revealed the Ancient Rome was a lot about rituals and myths. Let's also not forget the gorgeous women, gladiatorous men and other homages to Dionysus.


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