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"Rome" Pharsalus (TV Episode 2005) Poster

(TV Series)

(2005)

Quotes

Gaius Julius Caesar: I ought to have you scourged and crucified! In the future, you will remember that it is *I* that offers mercy. No one else. Clear?

Lucius Vorenus: Clear, sir.

Gaius Julius Caesar: Dismissed!

[Vorenus and Pullo salute and leave]

Mark Antony: I do not like to disagree with you, but you are being far too lenient with him. He let Pompey go, and you let him live? The man should be made an example of!

Gaius Julius Caesar: Any other man, certainly. But those two... They found my stolen standard. Now they survive a wreck that drowned an army and find Pompey Magnus on a beach. They have powerful gods on their side, and I will not kill any man with friends of that sort.

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[Vorenus and Pullo are stranded on an island, awaiting their death]

Titus Pullo: I don't understand it. Something should've turned up by now. I am not meant to die this way.

Lucius Vorenus: You were misinformed.

Titus Pullo: Doesn't seem right.

[pause]

Titus Pullo: Still... be good to see my mother again. Do you think they have a system, for finding people?

Lucius Vorenus: What?

Titus Pullo: In the afterlife? I mean, how do you-how do you go 'bout finding people? There must be millions.

Lucius Vorenus: There must be.

Titus Pullo: [pause] She wouldn't recognise me, probably. I was very young when she died.

[Another pause, as Vorenus shivers from the cold]

Titus Pullo: [sniggers] Probably give her a big scare though, huh? Big ugly brute coming along and giving her a hug.

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Gaius Julius Caesar: My poor boy.

Marcus Junius Brutus: I am sorry. I am so sorry.

Gaius Julius Caesar: Not at all. It is I who am sorry. I presented you with an impossible dilemma. You did only what you thought honourable.

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Pompey Magnus: Why so melancholy, Brutus?

Marcus Junius Brutus: Oh, do I seem so?

Pompey Magnus: Mmm.

Marcus Junius Brutus: Forgive me. No, Caesar's defeat is a blessing. We cannot endure tyrants. But I cannot celebrate it. Caesar was as my father to me.

Porcius Cato: I feel for you. When do we strike?

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Marcus Tullius Cicero: You may fight on as you wish. As for me, I will go from here and surrender myself to Caesar.

Porcius Cato: Have you no dignity? No honor?

Marcus Tullius Cicero: Some little, I hope. Not as much as you, of course.

Scipio: Caesar will kill you.

Marcus Tullius Cicero: That may be. I'm not afraid to die... I'm tired. I want to go home.

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Soldier: [as Brutus and Cicero approach Caesar's camp with the intention of surrendering] Halt, in the name of Rome!

Marcus Tullius Cicero: Calls himself Rome now, does he? Shameless.

Soldier: Who are you? What's your purpose?

Marcus Tullius Cicero: We are Rome, boy, what's left of it.

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[Vorenus and Pullo are stranded on an uninhabited island. Pullo tries to catch a fish with his spear]

Lucius Vorenus: Wasting your time! We'll die of thirst long before we die of hunger.

Titus Pullo: We could drink their blood.

[Pointing at the corpses of other soldiers lying on the beach]

Lucius Vorenus: Repeat?

Titus Pullo: All these dead men, we could drink their blood.

Lucius Vorenus: Too salty. Only makes you more thirsty. Putrid by now, anyway.

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[after their defeat at Pharsalus, Cato and Scipio says they must escape and rally fresh troops]

Marcus Junius Brutus: Might one ask where?

Porcius Cato: Africa. We must rally the cities of Africa!

Marcus Tullius Cicero: [bitter chuckle] Africa? Dear gods, we are fast running out of continents.

Marcus Tullius Cicero: And coin! We have taxed every last coin from Greece and spent it all! What shall we use to buy Africa's loyalty? Seashells?

Porcius Cato: We need buy nothing! We are the Senate of Rome...!

Marcus Tullius Cicero: We are old men with mud on our shoes!

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[while Antony and Caesar are poring over the map, Posca brings in shaving water]

Posca: It's ready.

[no response from Caesar]

Posca: Maps never redraw themselves, if that's what you're waiting for.

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[Caesar orders the army to prepare for battle]

Posca: We are outnumbered three to one on foot and five to one on horse. What uninjured men you have are scared and hungry and desperate.

Gaius Julius Caesar: That is the advantage we must press home.

Posca: I was not aware that irony had military usage.

Gaius Julius Caesar: We must win or die. Pompey's men have other options.

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[after Brutus announces that he plans to go with Cicero]

Porcius Cato: Without the force of your name, the cause of the Re...

Marcus Junius Brutus: Do not! Do not talk to me of the Republic! If I had known what wretched company and rotten food I would endure, if I had known what an old fool is Pompey, I would never have left Rome...!

[He realizes Pompey is standing behind him]

Marcus Junius Brutus: Forgive my anger. I'm not myself.

Pompey Magnus: Think nothing of it. I merit your disappointment.

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[Posca prepares to shave his master]

Gaius Julius Caesar: Try to avoid bloodshed this time.

Posca: Wait a day or two, and Pompey can shave you instead.

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[after the rout at Pharsalus, an officer finds Pompey sitting with his back against a tree]

Officer: Sir! Caesar's men are coming!

Pompey Magnus: [absently] I've cut my hand.

Officer: We should go, sir!

Pompey Magnus: It's not deep, but it hurts.

Officer: They will kill you, sir!

Pompey Magnus: It's of no consequence.

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[last lines; Pompey arrives on the beach in Alexandria]

Lucius Septimius: Sir! You probably don't remember me. Lucius Septimius. Centurion, Fourth Cohort in Spain.

Pompey Magnus: Lucius Septimius, of course, of course. Well, what are you doing here?

Lucius Septimius: Working for the gyppos, sir. It's not the legions, but one must earn's one's salt.

Pompey Magnus: Indeed he must. Well, onward, friend.

[He reaches out and takes Septimius's hand. Septimius seizes it and stabs Pompey in the chest. Pompey gasps]

Lucius Septimius: [whispering] I'm sorry, sir.

[He steps back and chops Pompey's head off]

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Lucius Vorenus: Surely Pompey had Caesar at greater disadvantage.

Pompey Magnus: He did... he did. It didn't seem possible to lose. That's always a bad sign.

Pompey Magnus: [Pompey begins to use a stick to draw the battlefield in the dirt] The battlefield was on a plain by a river at the foot of some low hills. Like this, you see. The lines met here. My men held their ground well, so I sent my horses at his right flank. Which is perfectly correct, you'll agree.

Lucius Vorenus: I do.

Pompey Magnus: Only the cowards were repulsed. Repulsed by a single cohort of reserves. Turned and fled, 200 horses. Crashed directly into my left flank. Rolled up my line like a carpet. Put the whole damn army to flight. And here I am. That's how Pompey Magnus was defeated. That's how the Republic died.

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Lysandros: Hello, friends. Feeling better, nay? Strong?

Lucius Vorenus: Strong enough.

[he points at Pompey]

Lucius Vorenus: Tell me something, what is the name of that Roman?

Lysandros: His name is, uh... Aeneas Mella.

Lucius Vorenus: Aeneas Mella.

Lysandros: That's what he said.

Lucius Vorenus: What do you hear of Caesar and Pompey?

Lysandros: They fought, I heard.

Titus Pullo: And?

Lysandros: You know who won.

Lucius Vorenus: Tell us.

[Lysandros looks at them for a moment, then waves his hand dismissively]

Lysandros: Pfft! I was going to let you in anyway.

Titus Pullo: [to Vorenus] What's he talking about?

Lysandros: You boys are clever fellows, I bet. Know how to fight. Me and my boys can't take his people alone. Us and you together, no problem. We go down middle on the reward.

Titus Pullo: Not a bad idea.

Lysandros: You can have the wife and children. I take the slaves.

[Vorenus leans forward, staring straight at Lysandros]

Lucius Vorenus: Walk away, and do not speak of this again.

Lysandros: I see. Think you don't need me, eh? Think you can keep the reward for yourself? Fuck you, not going to happen.

Titus Pullo: Don't.

Lysandros: Fuck you! I gave you your lives back. I can take them away again, easy.

[Vorenus stands, still staring at Lysandros]

Lucius Vorenus: [coldly] When I am finished speaking, you will turn and run.

[he points]

Lucius Vorenus: That way.

Lysandros: [grabbing his crotch] That way? What about this way?

Lucius Vorenus: Do not stop until you are out of my sight and do not delay, or I will kill you.

Lysandros: [to Pullo] What's wrong with him?

Lucius Vorenus: I am finished speaking.

[Lysandros reaches for his sword, but Vorenus stabs him through the throat; Pullo doesn't even flinch]

Titus Pullo: Bit harsh, innit? Fair enough deal he was offering, I thought.

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[after letting Pompey go]

Titus Pullo: Unwise and unfriendly, I call it. Unwise and unfriendly. And for why? Why? We had him. We HAD him! Horses. Never mind horses. Never mind gold! Caesar would've given us farms, and fields, and orchards, and great flocks of slaves, and cattle, and Dis knows what...

Lucius Vorenus: 'Sist! Pompey Magnus is no damned slave to be sold for money.

Titus Pullo: Don't see why not!

Lucius Vorenus: There's a great deal you don't see.

[Vorenus walks ahead; Pullo turns to their donkey]

Titus Pullo: There's a great deal he doesn't see neither.

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See also

Trivia | Goofs | Crazy Credits | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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