In North Fork, Lucas McCain meets Micah Torrence, now a drunk but at one time considered one of the ablest lawmen in the territory. He admits he lost his nerve and it led him to a life of ... See full summary »

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Flory Sheltin (as Robert Wilke)
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Storyline

In North Fork, Lucas McCain meets Micah Torrence, now a drunk but at one time considered one of the ablest lawmen in the territory. He admits he lost his nerve and it led him to a life of drink. Lucas offers him a job as a ranch hand and uses a tough-love approach to get him to sober up. The Shelton brother ride into town looking to get even with Micah who jailed them 10 years before. Lucas is lured into a trap but it's Micah who comes to his rescued. Written by garykmcd

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Family | Western

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Release Date:

21 October 1958 (USA)  »

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(RCA Sound Recording)

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The characters played by James Drury ,R.G Armstrong and Warren Oates in Sam Peckinpah's film 'Ride the High Country' had their genesis in the roles Peckinpah wrote for them here. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Lloyd Carpenter: Just hold up, boys. I had it easy in my mind we was headed for Baesore.
Andrew Sheltin: Well, you see Lloyd, we ain't never been to Northfork.
Flory Sheltin: Fact of the matter is we heard talk that Micah Torrance was headed there. We've been aimin' to do him in as you well know.
Lloyd Carpenter: And I thought we was going to make us a pot of money in the cattle business.
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Crazy Credits

Chuck Connors breaks the 4th wall in the opening credits after he shoots his riffle and then stares into the camera. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Sam Meet Warren
19 June 2013 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This is a highly entertaining episode that puts the series firmly on its way to a winning formula. But what really distinguishes this episode -- indeed, makes it historic -- is that it is the first time that Warren Oates ever appeared in a Sam Peckinpah-directed project. Oates would go on to become one of the constants, one of the trademarks, of a Peckinpah movie. This would culminate 16 years later in the classic "Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia," one of my all-time favorites. And, I must say, the thing that makes this episode so entertaining is that it certainly has all the trademarks of a Peckinpah-Oates collaboration, even on the first outing. There is the explosive violence -- people, including Oates, getting thrown into the air backwards by gun blast; and Oates breaking up a bar with the same loud, dumb, bad boy-man glee he'd raise to perfection in the "Wild Bunch." Find this episode and watch history in the making!


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