The Ray Bradbury Theater (1985–1992)
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Tyrannosaurus Rex 

Bombastic producer Joe Clarence hires Terwilliger to do the stop-motion animation for a dinosaur film he's making. Frustrated at Clarence's constant bullying and complaining, Terwilliger subconsciously finds a way to work out his stress.

Director:

(as Gilles Behat)

Writers:

(screenplay), (story)
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
...
...
Jim Dunk ...
Julie Reitzman ...
Glass' Niece
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Storyline

Bombastic producer Joe Clarence hires Terwilliger to do the stop-motion animation for a dinosaur film he's making. Frustrated at Clarence's constant bullying and complaining, Terwilliger subconsciously finds a way to work out his stress.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


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Release Date:

14 May 1988 (France)  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

 
That's a Monster
24 March 2015 | by See all my reviews

This is the first of the Ray Bradbury Theatre episodes I ever saw. A young stop-action animator is bullied by a horrible movie producer (Mr. Clarence, a disfigured man who is confined to a wheelchair) who is constantly making changes in his creations. After numerous invasions into his craft, he creates a tyrannosaurus rex that looks just like the producer. When the producer realizes what the man has done, he pretty much sends him packing. The young man decides he has had enough and takes his toys to go away. The producer's lawyer who has allied himself with the young guy (because he has also been bullied) and tells the producer that the young man actually idolizes him and manages to keep them both employed. That he will be immortalized by this creation. This may be a mistake. Still, a striking character and idea.


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