Quincy M.E. (1976–1983)
7.5/10
50
3 user

The Depth of Beauty 

Quincy investigates the suicide of a woman who was horribly disfigured after undergoing a face peel that was performed by an incompetent plastic surgeon. He then goes on a crusade to see ... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(teleplay), (story) | 3 more credits »
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
...
Dr. R. Quincy, M.E.
John S. Ragin ...
Dr. Robert Asten
...
Danny Tovo
...
Sam Fujiyama
Joseph Roman ...
Sgt. Brill
...
Dorrie Larkin
Rudy Solari ...
Deputy DA Baker
Donald May ...
Dr. Walt Mitchell
...
Harry Chase
...
Eddie Carlton (as Joey Foreman)
...
Judge Sheldon Monroe
Garnett Smith ...
Dr. Emile Green
Vernon Weddle ...
Hal Peters (as Vernon Weedle)
Barry Cahill ...
Hatton
...
Dr. Stone
Edit

Storyline

Quincy investigates the suicide of a woman who was horribly disfigured after undergoing a face peel that was performed by an incompetent plastic surgeon. He then goes on a crusade to see that his operation is shut down and he is aided by a former motion picture beauty who was victimized by the same doctor. Written by Brian Washington <Sargebri@att.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Mystery | Crime

Edit

Details

Language:

Release Date:

25 January 1979 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Near the end of this episode is a clip from Bonanza: The Julia Bulette Story (1959), where actress Jane Greer and Michael Landon appear together in a scene, which is supposed to represent the past beauty of now-disfigured actress Dorrie Larkin. See more »

Goofs

When Dorrie Larkin removes her lace scarf on TV, her eyes are disfigured, but when Quincy visits her later, they're not. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Quincy M.E.: Sugar and Spice (1981) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Sadly, I am not sure if things have changed that much since this episode aired.
20 April 2013 | by See all my reviews

any doctor can do plastic surgery Jane Greer

The show begins on a very stirring note--a woman, despite her husband's pleas, jumps from a building to her death. During the subsequent autopsy, Quincy notices that despite the damage from the fall, the woman was horribly scarred from a botched plastic surgery. It seems that the woman couldn't stand how she looked and this led to her killing herself. Then, when Quincy learns of another botched surgery from the same doctor, he's out on a crusade to stop this butcher. Yet, again and again, he's frustrated--frustrated that any doctor can do plastic surgery regardless of his or her training and also frustrated because the system moves so slowly to put a stop to such incompetence. Quincy's only chance to convince the court to stop the incompetent doctor is to get a famous actress (Jane Greer) to come forward and show the world how he turned her into a deformed creature.

Sometimes I like the 'crusader Quincy' episodes and occasionally I don't. This one worked well for me and was a very emotional episode. Plus, although the show aired well over thirty years ago, this sort of problem STILL exists--as gynecologists, psychiatrist and podiatrists CAN open up a plastic surgery practice without no specialized training. Overall, the show packs a great emotional wallop and it's as good now as when it first aired.


6 of 6 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?
Review this title | See all 3 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Paul Scheer on Why There Are No Bad Movies

Paul Scheer discusses The Disaster Artist and his love of awesomely bad movies. Plus, we dive into the origins of midnight movies and explore how The Room became a cult classic.

Watch now