Petticoat Junction (1963–1970)
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His Highness the Dog 

A crew is filming a commercial at Lost Lake, the commercial starring Prince Hamlet of Kronenberg von Auschwile III, a rather large and imposing but valuable dog. With their own ... See full summary »

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Cast

Episode cast overview:
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Kate Bradley
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Uncle Joe Carson
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Betty Jo Bradley (as Linda Kaye)
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Bobbie Jo Bradley
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Billie Jo Bradley
Mike Minor ...
Steve Elliott
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Sam Drucker
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Mort Morton
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Storyline

A crew is filming a commercial at Lost Lake, the commercial starring Prince Hamlet of Kronenberg von Auschwile III, a rather large and imposing but valuable dog. With their own transportation broken down, Mr. Morton, the film crew director, needs Steve to fly him immediately to make a connection to a flight to New York. However, Hamlet can't risk the flight in Steve's plane, so he has to stay at the Shady Rest under the care of Uncle Joe until Mr. Morton can pick him up later. With all the special treatment Uncle Joe and the girls give Hamlet, Dog feels like the forgotten family member. So, Dog runs off. Feeling like Hamlet needs to earn his keep, Uncle Joe makes Hamlet track Dog's scent. In the quest, everyone comes to realization who is really the valuable dog, but it could be a costly realization as Hamlet goes missing just before Mr. Morton is scheduled to return. Written by Huggo

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Comedy

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17 January 1967 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Soundtracks

Petticoat Junction
(uncredited)
Written by Curt Massey & Paul Henning
Performed by Curt Massey
[Series theme song played during the opening titles and credits]
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