The biggest Racket Man in town is out on bail and "blows up". Or did he? In order to get back the $100,000 he put up as security, the hoods' Bail Bondsman hires Gunn to find out one way or ... See full summary »

Director:

Reviews

Watch Now

With Prime Video

WATCH NOW

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
...
...
Lieutenant Jacoby
...
Ned Grant
...
...
Landers
Al Christy ...
Joe Cully
Owen Bush ...
Nibs
...
Regan
Fred Krone ...
Sales
...
Bartender (as Lennie Bremen)
...
Barber
Dick Bravo ...
Tout
Jim Hayward ...
Derelict
Stubby Kruger ...
Derelict
William Justine ...
Plainclothesman
Edit

Storyline

The biggest Racket Man in town is out on bail and "blows up". Or did he? In order to get back the $100,000 he put up as security, the hoods' Bail Bondsman hires Gunn to find out one way or the other. A derelict who disappeared with a $90,000 winning Irish Sweepstakes ticket may figure in the case. Written by dubchi

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Action | Crime | Drama | Mystery

Edit

Details

Language:

Release Date:

24 April 1961 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Quotes

Peter Gunn: A lot of people are interested in your husband's death - if he's dead.
Mrs. Cully: I'm afraid I don't follow you.
Peter Gunn: Maybe, that's because you're too far ahead of me.
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Parade of Colorful Characters
16 January 2017 | by (Claremont,USA) – See all my reviews

The ending's rather odd, but the episode's full of series color. Get a load of the seedy characters that come and go. How about the down-and-outer who's memorizing the encyclopedia so he can win big on a TV quiz show. Too bad the shows have gone off the air thanks to a cheating scandal on Twenty-One (1956-58). Then there's the bar scene where the barfly suddenly pops up from behind the register. Director Altman (yes, that Robert Altman) could have ended the scene in a routine cut-away. Instead he has the cheaply duded-out hooker enter so that the scene ends on a colorful note. And how about that flophouse where Wall Street investing gets discussed by two derelicts. What a hoot.

Oh yes, forgot the plot. Something about a criminal kingpin faking his death so that the cops will close the books on him. Pete's hired by the guy's bail bondsman to safeguard the hundred-thousand dollar bond the kingpin owes him. Anyway, Edie (Albright) fans should look elsewhere since there's no cuddling here. It's all business. My only gripe is that the fine actress Jean Willes as the kingpin's wife is underused. In fact, aspects of the entry, including the sudden ending, make me think some backing and filling went on during the production. Nonetheless, it's well worth tuning in.


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page