Peter Gunn (1958–1961)
7.4/10
40
2 user 1 critic

The Blind Pianist 

A suavely-dressed man calmly enters a nightclub late at night, carefully takes off his scarf and with it, strangles an older woman who is sitting at a table. The only other person in the ... See full summary »

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(teleplay), (teleplay) | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
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Guy Beckett
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Shirley Blaze
Herbert Ellis ...
Wilbur (as Herb Ellis)
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Stephen Ware
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Max Walston
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Poet
Elisabeth Talbot-Martin ...
Laura Hope Stanfield (as Elizabeth Talbot-Martin)
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Storyline

A suavely-dressed man calmly enters a nightclub late at night, carefully takes off his scarf and with it, strangles an older woman who is sitting at a table. The only other person in the nightclub is a blind pianist, who hires his friend Peter Gunn to help find the murderer. Written by David Stevens

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Genres:

Action | Crime | Drama | Mystery

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Release Date:

13 October 1958 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Goofs

At Peter Gunn's apartment Guy Beckett holds a revolver to the back of Peter's head, but while Peter is finishing his line the revolver suddenly moves several inches from the back of Peter's head. See more »

Quotes

Peter Gunn: Do you know a Mrs. Laura Hope Stanfield?
Wilbur: Mrs. S? Yeah, mmmmm. Like, she's the shining example of the plastic surgeon's art. Yeah, man. Like, she has had her face lifted so many times that when her neck itches she scratches her nose.
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Soundtracks

Peter Gunn
Music by Henry Mancini
Henry Mancini and His Orchestra; John Williams, piano; Robert Bain, guitar; Jack Sperling, drums; Rolly Bundock, bass; Larry Bunker, vibes; Richard Nash, Milt Bernhart, trombone; Pete Candoli, Conrad Gozzo', trumpet; Ted Nash, alto sax; Ronnie Lang, baritone sax; Gene Cipriano, flute.
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User Reviews

 
Unique Opening Scene Is The Highlight
22 December 2009 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Here's another memorable beginning, with some nice film-noir camera angles as we see a blind piano player sitting at the keys while a well-dressed man sneaks up on a woman at the bar a few feet away and strangles here with his scarf.

We soon find out - this is not one of those shows with a twist at the end - that the pianist can see. He had been to Antwerp recently for a special operation and had gotten his eyesight back. Being a successful blind pianist, he "didn't want to hurt his act," he tells Pete, who is impressed he didn't blow his cover during the killing but not impressed the man didn't go to the police right afterward.

Gunn gives the pianist 24 hours to go to the police, or he will, and the musician will be charged with accessory-after-the-fact. So, the piano-man gives our man a vague description of the killer (Gunn never needs much) and Pete goes to work.

Later, we get a dose of the "beatnik" scene and lingo of the day as one of Gunn's pals (he has them all over town) tells him what he knows using every hip phrase of the day. It's fun at first, but goes on a little long. It picks up a little when a femme fatale of sorts "Shirley Blaze," enters the picture.

Overall, this episode isn't as intense as it looked it was going to be after that unique opening, but it was decent.


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