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This episode is best remembered for Del Boy falling through an open bar flap. The scene derived from John Sullivan watching a man do the exact same thing in a wine bar, except he grabbed onto the fixed part of the bar so he didn't fall right over. Sullivan thought it funny for the man's body language, trying to recover his cool. Sullivan wanted a slip, stumble, and a tree like fall; David Jason thought Del should go all the way over - start to go sideways, and than go over without looking in the direction of the fall, which Jason thought was the key to the scene. There was a hidden crash mat, but it was a hard shot to get because it was hard not to look where Jason was falling; Jason had done a number of falls in the theatre so that came in handy. Just as funny was Trigger's baffled reaction to Del's sudden disappearance. Jason gets people asking him about that fall all the time, and some never like to talk about anything else, but he's happy to be remembered for something so iconic.
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The script was based on Gordon Gekko from the movie Wall Street (1987), to reinvent a new image for Del Boy and bring Cassandra and Raquel into the scripts.
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The scene where Rodney is dropped off at a posh area called the King's Avenue is based on a true occasion for John Sullivan as a schoolboy.
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Before the start of the sixth series, David Jason was annoyed about something and went to see John Sullivan. Sullivan was writing terrific scripts that were too long and had to be edited down to 30 minutes. Jason felt they were cutting more funny material than most sitcoms manage in a full episode. One edit that had particularly vexed Jason was during the Series 5 episode Tea For Three. After Del Boy returned from a disastrous hang-gliding session, he originally had a speech Jason described as "beautifully constructed, full of suppressed rage" about all of the places Del had visited. Jason considered it a comic masterpiece, but because Tea For Three had overrun, half the speech got cut. Sullivan agreed with Jason that the episodes needed to be longer. Jason and Sullivan approached Gareth Gwenlan while he was producing Series 6 with the plan to extend the episodes from 30 to 50 minutes. Gwenlan didn't think that was possible since sitcoms were traditionally 30 minutes in length and couldn't sustain a longer running time. Jason said that would be true of an average writer, but not one of Sullivan's caliber. And yet they still keep cutting great material. Gwenlan than okayed the idea.
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Del Boy mentions once working at the Tower of London; in real life David Jason once studied raven behavior there when portraying one in a pantomime.
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The first standard episode of the show since Who Wants to be a Millionaire at the end of Series 5. All the episodes in between were standalone Christmas specials, and were now no longer 30 minutes in length.
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The decision to extend the running times of episodes was the point where Only Fools and Horses.... (1981) came into its own as a comedy-drama, according to David Jason. Now not just a sitcom, there was more time for John Sullivan's great lines, and more space for things to unfold. Jason doubted that without the extra length, the romances between Del and Raquel and Rodney and Cassandra would never have developed, and he was glad to have Tessa Peake-Jones and Gwyneth Strong in the cast because they knew what they were doing and fit right in.
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For the sixth series, production relocated to Bristol, but was never actually filmed in Peckham, just other bits of the capital. But they had to film away from London because it was tougher and more expensive to get licenses to film. It was also harder to film there without attracting a crowd wanting autographs or just asking questions right before they were about to film a scene. Shooting outdoor scenes were than moved to Bristol, but red buses were put in the background to imply London.
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The debut of Rodney's future wife Cassandra Parry.
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This episode is best remembered for Del Boy falling through an open bar flap. The scene derived from John Sullivan watching a man do the exact same thing in a wine bar, except he grabbed onto the fixed part of the bar so he didn't fall right over. Sullivan thought it funny for the man's body language, trying to recover his cool. Sullivan wanted a slip, stumble and a tree like fall; Jason thought Del should go all the way over - start to go sideways, and than go over without looking in the direction of the fall, which David Jason thought was the key to the scene. There was a hidden crash mat, but it was a hard shot to get because it was hard not to look where Jason was falling; Jason had done a number of falls in the theatre so that came in handy. Just as funny was Trigger's baffled reaction to Del's sudden disappearance. Jason gets people asking him about that fall all the time, and some never like to talk about anything else, but he's happy to be remembered for something so iconic.
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Del Boy mentions he once had a job at the Tower of London; in real life, David Jason once studied raven behavior there while portraying one in a pantomime.
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The first standard episode of Only Fools and Horses.... (1981) since Who Wants to be a Millionaire at the end of Series 5. All the episodes in between were standalone Christmas specials. Also, episodes are no longer 30 minutes in length.
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