Rod Serling's Night Gallery: Season 2, Episode 3

Since Aunt Ada Came to Stay/With Apologies to Mr. Hyde/The Flip Side of Satan (29 Sep. 1971)
"Night Gallery" Since Aunt Ada Came to Stay/With Apologies to Mr. Hyde/The Flip Side of Satan (original title)

TV Episode  -   -  Drama | Fantasy | Horror
7.1
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Ratings: 7.1/10 from 121 users  
Reviews: 6 user | 2 critic

Craig Lowell suspects that his wife's sweet Aunt Ada is actually a witch. / Doctor Jekyll drinks his potion with unusual results. / Callous disc jockey J. J. Wilson finds himself spinning platters at a hellish radio station.

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(teleplay), (short story "The Witch"), 4 more credits »
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Title: Since Aunt Ada Came to Stay/With Apologies to Mr. Hyde/The Flip Side of Satan (29 Sep 1971)

Since Aunt Ada Came to Stay/With Apologies to Mr. Hyde/The Flip Side of Satan (29 Sep 1971) on IMDb 7.1/10

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Cast

Episode credited cast:
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Craig Lowell (segment "Since Aunt Ada Came to Stay")
...
Joanna Lowell (segment "Since Aunt Ada Came to Stay")
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Prof. Nicholas Porteus (segment "Since Aunt Ada Came to Stay")
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Aunt Ada Burn Quigley (segment "Since Aunt Ada Came to Stay")
...
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J.J. Wilson (segment "The Flip Side of Satan")
Eldon Quick ...
Frank Heller (segment "Since Aunt Ada Came to Stay")
Charles Seel ...
Cemetery Caretaker (segment "Since Aunt Ada Came to Stay")
Alma Platt ...
Housekeeper (segment "Since Aunt Ada Came to Stay")
Arnold F. Turner ...
Messenger Boy (segment "Since Aunt Ada Came to Stay") (as Arnold Turner)
Jack Laird ...
Laboratory Assistant (segment "With Apologies to Mr. Hyde")
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
...
Himself - Host
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Storyline

Craig Lowell suspects that his wife's sweet Aunt Ada is actually a witch. / Doctor Jekyll drinks his potion with unusual results. / Callous disc jockey J. J. Wilson finds himself spinning platters at a hellish radio station.

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Release Date:

29 September 1971 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Jack Laird, who plays the laboratory assistant in the "Mr. Hyde" segment, was one of the show's producers plus wrote a few of the episode stories. See more »

Quotes

Himself - Host: For those of you who've never met me, you might call me the undernourished Alfred Hitchcock. The great British craftsman and I do share something in common. An interest in the oddball. a predilection toward the bizarre. And this place is nothing if it isn't bizarre, by virtue of the paintings you see hanging around me. This item here is called "Since Aunt Ada Came to Stay." And Aunt Ada's a most memorable character. You may not like her, but I seriously doubt if you'll ever forget her. Be ...
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User Reviews

 
One of the best
22 February 2011 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

"Since Aunt Ada Came To Stay" is one of the very best NG's, with Jeanette Nolan's very scary Aunt Ada one of the most fearlessly determined little old ladies you may be sorry you ever knew about. Director Jerrold Freedman and the editor really keep the story going, and Freedman comes up with some great visual ideas and gimmicks (Love Nolan peering down from the staircase), though some of the sound effects are questionable.

Farentino's work here is oddly touching, and he conveys a rational man who puts his bedrock beliefs aside to save his wife. Michelle Lee doesn't get to do much but She's typically beautiful and believable in her acting. The story's one big flaw is that the husband discovers real evidence of Aunt Ada's plan (and that She is really NOT Aunt Ada) but acts like he has no evidence.

To me the light touch on the ending has an effective, dreamlike quality. There is something primal and perhaps ill advised about this material: it plays on our fear of old women that for many may go back to childhood. Still, if you are looking for a scare, Nolan (who was Orson Welles's Lady McBeth) can hardly be topped!


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