Jessica visits her nephew Johnny, recently recruited onto a Major League Baseball team, and then must solve the murder of a scheming news reporter.

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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
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Johnny Eaton
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Doc Evans
Tim Dunigan ...
Charley Holcomb / Freddy Masters
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Harry Dial
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Pete Briggs
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Loretta Lee
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Roz Briggs
Robert Mandan ...
Irving Randolph
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Lt. Caceras
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Al Sidell
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Kel Murray
Rick Dean ...
Mike Warlop
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Young Officer
Ed Hooks ...
Bellman
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Storyline

Jessica visits the Scottsdale, Arizona training of the Tucson Comets, which her nephew Johnny Eaton and his mate Charley Holcomb just transferred to. Shortly after suave Charley cuts short his date with sports reporter Loretta Lee after she mentioned his Dixie past, she's found murdered in that hotel room. Lt. Caceras first assumes a robbery, then arrests Charley having found out his false identity. Jessica believes in his innocence and snoops on for baseball-related motives. Written by KGF Vissers

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Genres:

Crime | Drama | Mystery

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Release Date:

7 May 1989 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

As he did in several other "Murder, She Wrote" scripts, writer Donald Ross named several of the characters after jazz musicians. John Eaton is a pianist and jazz educator. Doc Evans was a traditional jazz cornetist from the 1930's until his death in 1977. Pete Briggs was the tuba player for Louis Armstrong's Hot Seven in 1927. Harry Dial was a drummer who also worked with Armstrong. Irving Randolph was a 1930's trumpeter who played with Cab Calloway. Lt. Caceres is named after 1940's baritone saxophonist Ernie Caceres. Kel Murray was a non-jazz bandleader who shared the 1935 "Let's Dance" broadcasts with Benny Goodman and Xavier Cugat. Mike Warlop is named after 1930's French jazz bandleader Michel Warlop. There is also an unseen but mentioned character named Flip Phillips, after the star tenor saxophonist from Woody Herman's First Herd in the mid-1940's. See more »

Quotes

Harry Dial: Now look, lady. If you're so interested in male anatomy, I can give you a good look at mine - all of it.
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User Reviews

 
Murder meets baseball
19 September 2017 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

Have always been quite fond of 'Murder She Wrote'. It is a fun and relaxing watch that makes you think as you try to unwind in the evening. If one wants more complex, twisty mysteries with lots of tension and suspense 'Murder She Wrote' may not be for you, but if you want something light-hearted and entertaining but still provide good mysteries 'Murder She Wrote' fits the bill just fine.

While there are some excellent previous episodes to Season 5 (especially "Mr Penroy's Vacation", "The Search for Peter Kerry", "A Little Night Work", "Fire Burn, Cauldron Bubble" and "The Last Flight of the Dixie Damsel"), which generally is one of the better seasons, not all the episodes are great. While it is better than "Truck Stop" (to me the weakest and strangest of Season 5), "Three Strikes You're Out" did feel a bit lacking.

The mystery itself engages in how the deductions are done and how it is solved and everything revolving the baseball and the conflicts behind the scenes were interesting, but there are far more inspired and crisper paced mysteries. As well as more surprising reveals and more believable motives, the nature of the murder was less surprising.

Neither are most of the supporting cast are that inspired as characters that are not particularly well defined. Only Anne Lockhart and Vince Edwards rise properly above the material or stand out. Terri Garber also fares very well in one of the juicier roles but she deserved more to do. There are no problems to be had with Angela Lansbury though, she's terrific.

Production values as ever are slick and stylish, love the setting here. The music has energy and has presence but also not making the mistake of over-scoring, while it is hard to forget or resist the theme tune.

The writing is mostly thought-provoking, light-hearted and amiable.

Overall, above average but lacking and less than inspired episode. 6/10 Bethany Cox


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