The Monkees (1966–1968)
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The Spy Who Came in from the Cool 

The Central Intelligence Service recruits the Monkees to capture two foreign spies, Boris and Madame, after Davy unwittingly purchases a pair of red maracas with a hidden microfilm inside.

Director:

(as Robert Rafelson)
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
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Davy (as David Jones)
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Booth Colman ...
The Chief
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Midget
Arlene Charles ...
Lee Kolima ...
Yakimoto
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Storyline

The Central Intelligence Service recruits the Monkees to capture two foreign spies, Boris and Madame, after Davy unwittingly purchases a pair of red maracas with a hidden microfilm inside.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Music

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Details

Language:

Release Date:

10 October 1966 (USA)  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(as color by Pathé)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Quotes

Genie: Do not fear master, your genie will help you.
Davy: Huh, imagine that: wrong show.
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Connections

References I Dream of Jeannie (1965) See more »

Soundtracks

All The King's Horses
Written and Produced by Michael Nesmith
Performed by The Monkees
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User Reviews

 
Arlene Martel and Jacques Aubuchon
10 December 2013 | by See all my reviews

Bob Rafelson's third directorial effort, "The Spy Who Came in from the Cool" is another bright entry, with Davy unwittingly buying a pair of red maracas containing a hidden microfilm; the two spies are played by Jacques Aubuchon and lovely Arlene Martel, soon to gain cult status as Spock's wife T'Pring in STAR TREK's "Amok Time." The CIS agents are played by Don Penny and Booth Colman. With such a non stop array of gags, we get an astounding four songs: a second appearance for both "(I'm Not Your) Steppin' Stone" and "Saturday's Child," plus a pair of Michael Nesmith tracks recorded the same day (June 25), "The Kind of Girl I Could Love" (co-written by Roger Nichols, featured on the second LP MORE OF THE MONKEES) and "All the King's Horses," unreleased until 1990, with Nesmith backing Micky's lead vocal. The fifth broadcast (Oct 10 1966, the same day their debut LP came out), "The Spy Who Came in from the Cool" was 6th in production, filmed June 27-July 1.


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