Barnaby and Troy tackle two separate cases as Troy prepares to leave Midsomer after his promotion to DI.

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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
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Daniel Casey ...
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Tom
John Carlisle ...
Lord Fitzgibbon
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Timothy Webster
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Lillian Webster
Marc Buchner ...
Daniel Webster
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Simon Mayfield
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Steven Curtis (as Jamie King)
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Charlie Birkett
Andrew Dunn ...
Constable Crabbe
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Jerry Curtis
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Storyline

A cave in of a local canal tunnel under restoration reveals the skeletons of eight individuals. While most of the skeletons are from a cave in when the canal was under construction in the 19th century, one is obviously of a more recent vintage. Dental records identify him as Eric Edwards who was reported missing in 1965. Supt. Barnaby delves into the history of the canal to see if he can find a connection. DS Troy is over the moon when he learns that he has qualified as a Detective Inspector and that there may be a job for him in another county. In what may be his last case in Midsomer, he follows up on an anonymous tip that teenagers are harassing a local hermit, Tom. When one of those teenagers is shot through the head, Barnaby leaves "Inspector" Troy in charge of the case. Written by garykmcd

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Plot Keywords:

canal | tunnel | skeleton | cave in | tramp | See All (37) »

Genres:

Crime | Drama | Mystery

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Release Date:

2 November 2003 (UK)  »

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Did You Know?

Trivia

A young Superman - Henry Cavill can be seen in this episode. See more »

Goofs

Troy drives a Rover 45 with registration plate BX03 ZZG. When Barnaby and Troy learn that Cully may be in mortal danger, they jump into Troy's car and leave the station with a blue rooftop light and siren. But the plate on the car has changed to BU03 ZZG. As they are seen driving with the flashing light and siren, and arriving on-scene, the plate has returned to the original BX03 ZZG. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Daniel Webster: Trouble.
Cully Barnaby: What?
Daniel Webster: Incoming. My dynamic dad.
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Connections

References The Land That Time Forgot (1974) See more »

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User Reviews

 
'Midsomer Murders' bids farewell to Sergeant Troy
20 January 2017 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

Despite not being anywhere near as good now, 'Midsomer Murders' is still a show visited and re-visited with great pleasure. There are episodes better than others, with a fair share of disappointments especially in the later seasons, like with any show in existence, but when 'Midsomer Murders' was good it was good to outstanding.

Commencing the seventh season, "The Green Man" bids farewell to Sergeant Troy. Always did love him and Barnaby together, and it's sad to see him go, but "The Green Man" serves as a great final episode to him that utilises him very well. The episode is interesting for having a two-track case that don't feel in any way disjointed, the character of Tom and his subplot and also Barnaby's decision at the end.

This decision/action has proved controversial, but am also of the opinion that the decision worked within the episode and wasn't the wrong one considering the scenario.

As always, the production values are top notch, with to die for scenery, the idyllic look of it contrasting very well with the story's occasional grimness, and quaint and atmospheric photography. The music fits perfectly, and the theme tune one of the most memorable and instantly recognisable of the genre.

Meanwhile, the script is smart and thought-provoking with some nice quirky humour, a suitable grimness and colourful characters. The character of Tom and his story brought a sense of melancholy that was very poignant and genuinely so, and his last scene is indeed one of the most striking things about "The Green Man".

The story is hugely compelling, and never simplistic and never losing any of the maturity of most of the previous episodes. There is a lot going on mostly without being cluttered or rushed (remarkable for an episode that as ever is heavy in exposition), and that nothing is what it seems, or very few people are who they seem adds to the complexity, while there are no out of kilter scenes. The twists, red herrings and turns, in classic 'Midsomer Murders' tradition, keep coming, with several neatly interwoven subplots, and rarely in an obvious or press-the-rewind button. The characters are colourful, eccentric and not what they seem.

John Nettles as always is a joy as Barnaby, with Daniel Casey contrasting with him with ease, their chemistry as always a huge part of the episode's charm. Jane Wymark charms too, while in support David Bradley gives one of the show's most outstanding guest turns. The only small downside is Cherie Lunghi having little to do, small because she's still fine, just that she deserved more.

In summary, a wonderful episode and as well as being a promising start for Season 7 it is a pleasingly bittersweet send-off to Troy. 10/10 Bethany Cox


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