Crockett and Tubbs join forces with the Federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms ... including Crockett's old partner Evan Freed. Tubbs tries to understand their troubled relationship.

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Cast

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Evan Freed
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Guzman
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ATF Agent Wilson
Steven Brown ...
Guzman's Bodyguard
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Storyline

Crockett and Tubbs join forces with the Federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms ... including Crockett's old partner Evan Freed. Tubbs tries to understand their troubled relationship.

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3 May 1985 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Jan Hammer received an Emmy nomination for his score to this episode. See more »

Goofs

In the final shootout Guzman's driver disappears between cuts. See more »

Quotes

Det. Ricardo 'Rico' Tubbs: Excuse the hell out of me.
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Soundtracks

You Only Left Your Picture
(uncredited)
Written by De Harriss
Performed by Fashion
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User Reviews

 
The depths of despair
13 April 2016 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

'Evan' opens up with a stylish MAC-10 demo and even an explosion, but that's no forecast for where this episode is headed. The tension isn't in the bust or the shootouts, it's in the friction between partners - both past and present. Crockett's faced with years of pent-up guilt when an old friend shows up during an arms deal (William Russ). The issue between them is ignorance, how they both dealt with it in their youth and how it cost a close friend his life. What really amazes about this episode is its sensitivity in addressing homophobia, especially for a macho cop show in the mid-'80s. Clearly uncharacteristic of the time and climate.

And what really elevates this episode is the excellent acting. Don Johnson is on fire here, and his scene with Philip Michael Thomas at the gas station might be their finest together on the show. Both sides are hurting on this issue and that makes for superb drama. There's one line that rings like an explosion and it comes from Tubbs:

"You've got the courage to do this job, every day. Have the courage to tell Evan what it is you have to say."

'Evan' really is something different for this show, and a tremendous effort. Gold star all the way.

10/10


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