Against his better judgment, Mannix agrees to look into the case of a young man who twice robbed the same pharmacy seeking drugs. The second time, he shot one of the employees, but even ... See full summary »

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(as Nick Webster)

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(created by), (created by) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
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Officer Delaney
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Lt. Clay Lockwood
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Vodich
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Hammel
Leslie Charleson ...
Marge Lavor (as Leslie Ann Charleson)
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William Lavor
Gordon Hoban ...
Danny Lavor
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Mr. Levine
John Carter ...
Johnson
Paul Sears ...
First Policeman
Rita D'Amico ...
Nurse
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Storyline

Against his better judgment, Mannix agrees to look into the case of a young man who twice robbed the same pharmacy seeking drugs. The second time, he shot one of the employees, but even though the police had the pharmacy staked out, he managed to escape. The accused man's wife hires Mannix, insisting that her husband was incapable of committing such a crime. Mannix initially finds little to encourage him, but as he delves into the background of the man who was shot, he finds that the police account of what supposedly happened doesn't add up. Written by aldanoli

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17 January 1970 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

 
Good plot, bad direction, so-so dialogue
14 January 2017 | by (LA, CA) – See all my reviews

Mannix is persuaded to look into the case of a recovering drug addict who as the episode starts is shown holding up a downtown drugstore and shooting one of the pharmacists in charge. How can this kid NOT be guilty?

Stick around, gang.

This clever mystery is nearly undone by stilted dialogue and mediocre direction. The action is clumsily staged and the camera often seems to be in the wrong place.

As for the dialogue, I was surprised to learn that the writer of this episode, Lou Shaw, had written for a number of well-known sitcoms including "Love American Style" and Norman Lear's "Maude," and with that kind of resume, you'd think the lines would be sharper.

I rate this one a "C."


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