There's a mouse loose about the house and, though Larry kills it,Robin wants him to keep quiet about it as the girls are scared of the mouse and Robin can exploit their fear to get closer ... See full summary »

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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
Richard O'Sullivan ...
Robin
Paula Wilcox ...
Chrissy
Sally Thomsett ...
Jo
...
Mrs. Roper
...
Roper
Doug Fisher ...
Larry
Annie Hayes ...
Rita
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Storyline

There's a mouse loose about the house and, though Larry kills it,Robin wants him to keep quiet about it as the girls are scared of the mouse and Robin can exploit their fear to get closer to Chrissy. George also wants to keep up the pretence that the mouse is still around to ward off a visit from Mildred's family, but it is ultimately Robin who gets trapped. Written by don @ minifie-1

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Comedy

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30 October 1974 (UK)  »

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References The World at War (1973) See more »

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great entertainment - still after 40 years !
17 June 2013 | by (Netherlands) – See all my reviews

My choice of 'Of mice and women' is inspired by a scene that never & nowhere happens in all the 'Man about the house'-series: the male lead almost gets into bed with the girl he fancies. And is rudely, and above all hilariously, interrupted in his effort.

This topic really touches the heart of the series: the continuing love tense between Robin Tripp (performed by Richard O'Sullivan) and Chrissy Plummer (played by Paula Wilcox). Their coupling is steadily prevented by Chrissy: although she likes Robin, her common sense tells her that she can get better than such a soft & not too bright boy.

This almost-couple is surrounded by an impressive cast of supporting actors and actresses. All set in sparkling plots of never-failing humor & quality, and shot in the best way the Seventies could provide.

The series' outlook definitely is very Seventies. For instance by often referring to World War 2 memories that were actual back then but clearly outdated now. Also having a solid verbal referring to sex: in the Seventies anti conceptive were around and AIDS wasn't. All the series are wrapped up in the low-pace society from those days: no email, no internet, no SMS - how could people survive without? Well, they did.


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