Lights Out (1946–1952)
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The Meddlers 

Cecil Crofton shows up at the backwoods, hillbilly shack of Purdy with a wild proposition on how the two can split a million dollars. Crofton as figured out that a ton gold that once ... See full summary »

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Cecil Crofton
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Purdy
Dan Morgan ...
Larro
Robert Hull ...
Col. Micah Larro
Lawrence Ryle ...
Capt. Nelson Larro (as Laurence Ryle)
Frank Gallop ...
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Cecil Crofton shows up at the backwoods, hillbilly shack of Purdy with a wild proposition on how the two can split a million dollars. Crofton as figured out that a ton gold that once belonged to the Confederacy is buried locally, in the cellar of a house that had burned down and was rebuilt. Purdy figures rightly that it's the old Larro place, but the abandoned house is cursed by the ghosts of Larro ancestors from the Civil War. Written by Jay Phelps <jaynashvil@aol.com>

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9 July 1951 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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John Carradine and E. G. Marshall
21 August 2011 | by See all my reviews

One of the few existing episodes of the mystery series LIGHTS OUT, based on the radio series of the same name, shot in New York during John Carradine's 1947-1953 hiatus from Hollywood. Carradine's earliest surviving TV appearance, playing Cecil Crofton, a history professor who convinces a local rube (E. G. Marshall) that a Confederate treasure lies hidden nearby, undeterred by the ominous warning "Larros catch meddlers!" A genuine horror tale using just three sets, ending with an effective sting in the tail. Carradine remained busy doing all kinds of TV fare for its first decade, mostly in Westerns, but by the late 60s he started appearing in more genre shows. E. G. Marshall may perhaps be best remembered by horror fans for his memorable performance in 1982's "Creepshow."


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