Leave It to Beaver (1957–1963)
7.5/10
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Brother vs. Brother 

Beaver feels betrayed when the first girl he ever wanted to bring home after school falls for big brother Wally as soon as they get there.

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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
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Richard Rickover (as Richard Correll)
Mimi Gibson ...
Mary Tyler
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Mr. Collins
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Storyline

When Mr. Collins announces that there will be a new student joining their class, Beaver and Gilbert hope that it is a boy they can play with rather than a "dopey" girl. Mary Tyler ends up being anything but dopey for Beaver, who, upon first sight, is immediately hit with his first case of puppy love, although he isn't sure what he is feeling beyond always wanting to look at her. Not knowing how to act around girls, he asks Wally for advice, after which he decides a good first step is to ask Mary if he can walk her home from school. She ultimately says yes, after their walk they agreeing that they will now only walk home with each other, and no one else. Beyond the ribbing Beaver gets from Gilbert and Richard, who are not yet at the stage of liking girls, Beaver runs into a problem. It seems as if Mary may have had ulterior motives in making this pact with Beaver, as she really wanted to get to know Wally. Wally, in turn, has no interest in a little girl like Mary, while in Beaver's ... Written by Huggo

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baseball cap | See All (1) »

Genres:

Comedy | Family

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Release Date:

5 May 1962 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Quotes

Wally Cleaver: If you want this girl to like you, you gotta quit goin' around like such a little slob.
Theodore Cleaver: Yeah. Boy, when you get mixed up with girls you sure have to give up a lot, don't ya?
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Connections

References The Huntley-Brinkley Report (1956) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Would have turned out better if the new kid was a shortstop.
11 May 2017 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

The new student in Mr. Collins class at Grant Avenue Grammar turns out not to be a great baseball player but a girl, Mary Tyler, with a killer smile—for Beaver anyway. And it's so good a smile that Beaver turns to Wally for advice on what to do. Try walking her home and talk, just like Huntley and Brinkley.

Second day and Beaver is putting on the "boy" with after shave and all. Noticeable enough to Ward and June that they make Beaver go upstairs and wash it off. Now it's dumping Richard and Gilbert after school so Beaver can walk Mary home; instead of trying to teach a rat to roll over. Beaver even walks Mary to his house to play Monopoly. Mary promises if Beaver promises to walk her home every day, she won't let any other boy walk her home. Things look good, until Wally walks in and Mary switches walkers—Beaver for Wally. And all this happens in a New York Minute. Beaver has been ditched. Love is fickle after all. And Wally does have such big muscles.

That night it's a cold dinner table as Beaver is snubbing Wally. June decides as it's a matter of the heart, she can intervene. Wrong call. Next day Ricard and Gilbert are giving Beaver the business about liking a girl. All they do is cause trouble. While Beaver is waiting for Mary, Mary is lying in wait for Wally. And she catches him, but he gives it to her straight. She's a dopey little girl and he's a junior in high school. Wally Cleaver is so mean it's over, Mary will never talk to Wally again. So back to Beaver, but Beaver does not take rebounds. Mary slips Beaver a note stating she is willing to let Beaver walk her home; return note to Mary clearly reads, Drop Dead. Beaver has decided he's not going to mess around with girls anymore; they're too hard to figure out. Wally agrees. Look at him, he's all grown up and even he can't figure girls out.


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