Law & Order: Season 13, Episode 3

True Crime (16 Oct. 2002)

TV Episode  -   -  Crime | Drama | Mystery
7.5
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McCoy becomes suspicious of a former police officer and current true crime writer investigating the death of a controversial rock singer, when the singer's wife is killed.

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Title: True Crime (16 Oct 2002)

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Cast

Episode credited cast:
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Det. Mike Foster
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Jeremy Cook
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Travis Jones
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Rain Bridgeman
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Susan Blommaert ...
Richard Bright ...
Dru Hunt
David W. Butler ...
Howard Rumsfeld
Dyron Holmes ...
Carter Newton
George Newton ...
New Hire
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Storyline

Investigating the death of a rock band singer who had large amounts of cocaine and heroin in her system, the detectives question a former boyfriend who was a disgruntled band mate of her late husband. The prosecutors are hampered by the actions of a retired detective, who worked a case with Briscoe several years back, turned writer whose unconventional research tactics makes him a suspect as well. Written by Anonymous

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16 October 2002 (USA)  »

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1.78 : 1
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Trivia

D.A. Arthur Branch asks, "Since when does freedom of the press apply only to the nattering nabobs of negativism?" This is a phrase used by former Vice-President of the United States Spiro Agnew (reportedly created by speech writer William Safire). See more »

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