L.A. Law (1986–1994)
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The Venus Butterfly 

Foster Troutman, a charming polygamist, causes an uproar at the firm over Becker and Markowitz's tax audit case of him and his 11 wives, and he offers Markowtiz a new sexual maneuver on ... See full summary »

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(created by), (created by) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
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Michael Kuzak
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Abby Perkins
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Victor Sifuentes
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Roxanne Melman
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Lynette Pierce
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Foster Troutman
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Storyline

Foster Troutman, a charming polygamist, causes an uproar at the firm over Becker and Markowitz's tax audit case of him and his 11 wives, and he offers Markowtiz a new sexual maneuver on pleasing a woman while Becker is attracted to his lawyer, Lynette Pierce. Meanwhile, Grace faces the difficult task of prosecuting Christopher Appleton, a gay man afflicted with AIDS, who's accused of the mercy killing his similarly infected lover. Abby faces an agonizing ordeal with Kelsey in search for her son when she receives news of an battered anonymous child's death. The other partners quarrel over who will get Chaney's desirable office, and with a coin toss, Markowitz wins. Written by Anonymous

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Drama

Certificate:

TV-PG
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Release Date:

21 November 1986 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Quotes

[first lines]
Arnie Becker: So, my client, Mrs. Troutman, decides that she needs to get away for a few days. She packs her things into her car, drives down to her condo in Palm Springs, and puts the key in the door. She opens the door, kicks off her high-heeled shoes, walks down the hallway to the bedroom to collapse in the bed, opens the bedroom door only to find the surprise of her life: her loving husband, in the bed... in the arms of another woman.
Douglas Brackman, Jr.: Excuse me, Arnold. But why are we squandering valuable ...
[...]
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