Kraft Suspense Theatre (1963–1965)
6.8/10
12
3 user

Jungle of Fear 

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Cast

Episode cast overview:
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Rory O'Rourke
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Colonel Juano Chauvin
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Lady Mei
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Alden Ritter
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Elena
Charlie Briggs ...
Boone Trimble (as Charles Briggs)
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Ching
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General John Doe
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Captain Fong
Tony Davis ...
Ying Li
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Peter Johnson
Gerald Jann ...
Kwang
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Genres:

Crime | Drama | Mystery

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Release Date:

22 April 1965 (USA)  »

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(Pathé)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

 
Ann Blyth plays a Chinese lady....'nuff said!
16 October 2015 | by See all my reviews

The fact that Ann Blyth plays a Chinese lady isn't surprising. Hollywood OFTEN did such outrageous casting--with a Swedish guy playing Charlie Chan, John Wayne playing Genghis Khan, Katharine Hepburn playing a Chinese peasant and Tony Randall playing the inscrutable Dr. Lao. Sadly, there are countless other similar sorts of miscastings of white actors playing Asians. Not only is this offensive and silly, but these were all roles that could have been played by Asians--and played better. Because of the ridiculous notion of Blyth in such a role (as well as her super-white looking son), you've got to knock a couple points off this episode of "Kraft Suspense Theatre" right off the bat.

The story is a silly affair with manly Robert Fuller playing an international adventurer, Rory O'Rourke, in a crappy Central American town where practically no one appears to be Hispanic!! Along the way, he meets up with a Chinese princess (Blyth) who, along with her kid, is trying to escape to freedom. But some evil general is also looking for them and O'Rourke's work is cut out for him.

This episode comes off like a bad B-movie from the 1930s brought to television. In the 30s, however, it would have worked a bit better as folks back then didn't know much about China and they would have just taken it for granted. Also, by 1965, the Chinese empire talked about in this film no longer existed--it was 16 years AFTER Mao's takeover of the country and this makes it all seem very dated. Plus, and I know this might sound mean, but who cares about some Chinese emperor in 1965?!

The show has some really bad writing, terrible miscasting and all the usual clichés you'd find in a crappy old film. A very, very weak and silly episode...one of the worst of the series.


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