David returns to master Li Sung, who has become ill and wants a promising student to take over his work. Unfortunately, the young man is torn between the school and his work as a policeman.

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(as Reza S. Badiyi)

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(developed for television by), | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Jack McGee (credit only)
...
...
Mike Roark
...
Colin Roark
George Loros ...
Joe Lynch
...
Man
...
Lina Raymond ...
Jo Lee
Stacy Keach Sr. ...
Tim Roark
...
Lynch's Henchman
Bill Deiz ...
Newscaster
Anne Bellamy ...
Michael's Mother
René Le Vant ...
1st Cop
Fred Franklyn ...
Lynch's Doctor (as Fredric Franklyn)
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Storyline

David returns to master Li Sung, who has become ill and wants a promising student to take over his work. Unfortunately, the young man is torn between the school and his work as a policeman.

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Release Date:

16 March 1979 (USA)  »

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4:3
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The episode was a back door pilot for a proposed series about a pair of contrasting brothers involved in Detective/Investigation work. Guest Actor Gerald McRaney would become best known for co-starring on Simon & Simon, a different variation on the proposed show's premise. See more »

Goofs

When the Hulk broke his feet out of the bottom of the stock, it is clear to see that he has green tights on. See more »

Quotes

[Lynch's henchman tries to feed him]
Joe Lynch: I don't want any.
Lynch's Henchman: You got to eat, Joe.
Joe Lynch: I told you I don't want any!
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User Reviews

 
Nothing to do with David Banner, the Hulk, or anything resembling good TV
1 May 2017 | by (United States of America) – See all my reviews

In this episode, David revisits Li Sung to try and learn from him again. This is a good plot idea. After all, David meets a lot of people, and some of them deserve to hear back from him; it's not as if each town the Hulk hits goes under permanent lockdown. The trouble is, while Li Sung is a pretty textured character in "Another Path", here he's just a generic philosophizing wise man. The bigger trouble is, this episode isn't about David or the Hulk. It's about Mike, Li's star student.

Now I'm sure you're thinking, So what, almost every episode puts a spotlight on whoever David is helping. But see, David doesn't really help Mike. Therein lies the key problem: not simply that David isn't the main character, but that he has no connection to the main character. He just chats with Li Sung about Li's imminent death and has a couple of Hulk-outs which feel like a distraction from the plot rather than a contribution to it.

This would still be acceptable if Mike were a decent character with a decent story. But despite a detailed, almost convoluted background, as a character Mike is an utterly cardboard Mary Sue, and a lifeless performance by Rick Springfield only makes him more unbearable.

But the story is the worst part. It asserts that law enforcement is morally equivalent to mob justice; at one point Mike actually states that the police are the villains and the mad bomber they are pursuing (who has already killed four people, including Mike's father) is the victim! This is just the tip of the iceberg, as the script weighs itself down with garbled imitations of Eastern philosophy and chronic disconnect with reality. The climax is so absurd that it's not even laughable.


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