David 'Braemer' meets an old Chinese master on the road who is on his way back to the school he founded in San Francisco. There they find one of his students running his old neighborhood with fear and corruption.

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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
...
...
Jack McGee (credit only)
...
The Incredible Hulk
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Irene Yah-Ling Sun ...
May Chuan
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Frank Silva (as Tom Lee Holland)
Joseph Kim ...
Mr. Fong
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Jane Chung ...
Gramma Loo
Sam Tampoya ...
Jim Fong
Helene Nelson ...
Receptionist (as Helene T. Nelson)
...
Driver (as Eric Stern)
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Storyline

David 'Braemer' meets an old Chinese master on the road who is on his way back to the school he founded in San Francisco. There they find one of his students running his old neighborhood with fear and corruption.

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TV-PG
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27 October 1978 (USA)  »

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4:3
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Did You Know?

Goofs

Although Tom Holland's character is named Steve Silva, the name is erroneously listed in the end credits as "Frank Silva." See more »

Quotes

Li Sung: I can feel it as sharply as you're seeing it, David. Fear.
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Connections

References The Incredible Hulk: Married (1978) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Chop-socky Time
8 March 2017 | by (United States of America) – See all my reviews

This one sure starts off promising. In an interesting hitchhiking mishap, David befriends Li Sung, a classic blind old wise man with powerful mojo. He offers to teach David some meditation techniques that may cure him of the Hulk.

Li's background and personality are well-developed, his friendship with David is convincing, and his faults make him more realistic and interesting than your stereotyped wise man. He also provides an introduction to a promising villain, Steve, the classic student who has abused what his master taught. When you see this guy punch a plaster head (silly, yes, but it's the focused way he does it), it makes you think the Hulk has a worthy foe at last. The buildup is good, too; Li and David's battle of wits with Steve provides for some intriguing plot.

But it all collapses in the finale. In typical chop-socky style, Li busts into Steve's fortress to tackle him and his army of karate thugs single-handed. The choreography and camera work here is painfully bad, doing absolutely nothing to make it believable that an old man like Li can knock out a horde of dangerous criminals. Moreover, though the Hulk comes to help, all he does is toss around a few thugs that Li already defeated. For all intents and purposes, Banner and the Hulk are absent from the finale, while Li comes off as an absurd Mary Sue. Even Steve never seems to stand a chance of beating him.

The episode closes charmingly, albeit without addressing the issue of Li's vigilantism. Though I really wish it had climaxed better, I enjoyed a good chunk of this ep.


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