I Love Lucy (1951–1957)
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Lucy Wants New Furniture 

Ricky insists that Lucy use her allowance to pay for new furniture she bought without his approval.

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, (as Madelyn Pugh) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
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Ethel Mertz
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Fred Mertz
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Storyline

Ricky insists that Lucy use her allowance to pay for new furniture she bought without his approval.

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Genres:

Comedy | Family

Certificate:

TV-G
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Release Date:

1 June 1953 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Ricky discovers that Lucy has hidden some new furniture in the kitchen, and corners her there to confront her about it. Her only escape is through the kitchen-to-living-room opening, and she has to climb down by stepping first on the desk, then on the chair to get to the floor. When the camera pulls back to a wide shot, four brackets can be seen holding the chair to the floor to avoid tipping and falling as Lucy, followed by Ricky, quickly exit the kitchen by this unusual route. See more »

Goofs

Lucy repeatedly runs from the Ricardos' living room through the Mertzs' living room and through a door stage right which is presumably their kitchen, out their back door, across the balcony and back to her kitchen, but in episode 'The Sublease' characters make frequent trips to the Mertzs' kitchen which is now stage left. Because Fred is such a cheapskate it isn't likely that he would have done such a drastic remodel. See more »

Soundtracks

Theme From 'I Love Lucy' (Instrumental)
Written by Eliot Daniel
Performed by Wilbur Hatch and the Desi Arnaz Orchestra
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