Young kindergarten teacher Rebecca Adler collapses in her classroom after losing intelligible speech while teaching students.



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Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Melanie Landon (as Reika Sharma)
Maya Massar ...
Asthma Mom
Dylan Basu ...
Asthma Boy
Sydney (as Ava Rebecca Hughes)
Kyarra Willis ...
Kid #2
Ethan Kyle Gross ...
Molnar (as Eitan Kyle Gross)
Candus Churchill ...
Substitute Teacher


Pretty 29-year-old kindergarten teacher Rebecca Adler collapses one morning as she teaches her young students, babbling incoherently and unintelligibly. When her physicians cannot diagnose her, Rebecca is sent to Princeton-Plainsboro Teaching Hospital (PPH) in New Jersey to consult with the foremost diagnostician in America, Dr. Gregory House. House's small team of young specialists perform all of the initial testing, including the taking of patient histories, performing environmental studies at her classroom and, by breaking and entering, her home. House firmly believes that everybody lies. He jokes that Rebecca might be running a meth lab in her basement, so he does not want her team to ask her for her house keys. No meth lab is found but there is pork in her refrigerator. Rebecca questions the fact that she has met Dr. Eric Foreman, Dr. Allison Cameron and Dr. Robert Chase (House's entire team), PPH hospital administrator Dr. Lisa Cuddy, and Dr. James Wilson, PPH oncologist and ... Written by LA-Lawyer/edited by statmanjeff

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Drama | Mystery


TV-14 | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:





Release Date:

16 November 2004 (USA)  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs


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Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1 / (high definition)
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Did You Know?


Shot using an orange hue lens. See more »


In the opening kindergarten classroom scene, the girl with long brown hair in the front row is seen seated in her seat as the teacher enters the room. Cut to another angle and she is seen approaching her seat and sitting down. See more »


Dr. Gregory House: [after questioning House's treatment plan for a patient] Why are you so afraid of making a mistake?
Dr. Lisa Cuddy: Because I'm a doctor. Because when we make mistakes people die.
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Features General Hospital (1963) See more »


You Can't Always Get What You Want
Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards
Performed by The Rolling Stones
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User Reviews

very good way to kick off the show, save for one glaring flaw
10 June 2007 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

House MD starts off in a very smart way because, with the exception of a few moments in some scenes, it could be any other episode. The show's structure from episode to episode relies on it being a case by case basis for the doctors to work on, and this one involving a kindergarten teacher (Robin Tunney), who collapses suddenly in her classroom while teaching, isn't exclusive as being something that could only happen in a pilot episode ala alien abduction in The X-Files. This goes for House's clinic cases too, in this case being a man who's completely orange (looked like someone out of Willy Wonka for a moment) and a boy who can't figure out what asthma is. Already creator/writer/producer David Shore sets up the dynamics of House's personality- acerbic wit, sometimes razor-sharp, but he does care deep down about what he does even it takes a lot, like the patient not wanting to live anymore in Tunney's case, for him to show it. And already right away Hugh Laurie displays his incredible ability to balance out how a man with quick thinking (usually with the conceit of 'oh, I just got it while talking about something else') and a cynicism that comes with the job, and a leg problem.

So why not exactly a great pilot, or rather something that could right away be one-upped? I think, really, it has to do with the direction from Bryan Singer, and specifically a technical decision. I know some may admire how Singer and his DP put a sort of purple-ish tint on the whole episode, but it just does not work, at all, especially in the context of the rest of the series which does not feature it again. It's a choice that didn't add anything dramatically to the episode, except perhaps to be something akin to what's done on CSI. It's too much of a distraction in scenes that should just be focused squarely on not getting in the characters/actors' way (the constant tracking shots, a trademark since the days of ER, is paramount), and keeping the mood tense during the moments of crises with the patient. It's not that it isn't decent what Singer's doing with Shore's material, and most notably this comes with the shots going inside of the patient's system to see what's going wrong, a visual effect probably taken from Singer's days doing X-Men. But that one tint makes what is otherwise an excellent pilot a downer.

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